Co-morbid medical and psychiatric illness and substance abuse in HCV-infected and uninfected veterans

A. A. Butt, U. A. Khan, K. A. McGinnis, M. Skanderson, Chian K Kwoh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Comorbidities may affect the decision to treat chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We undertook this study to determine the prevalence of these conditions in the HCV-infected persons compared with HCV-uninfected controls. Demographic and comorbidity data were retrieved for HCV-infected and -uninfected subjects from the VA National Patient Care Database using ICD-9 codes. Logistic regression was used to determine the odds of comorbid conditions in the HCV-infected subjects. HCV-uninfected controls were identified matched on age, race/ethnicity and sex. We identified 126 926 HCV-infected subjects and 126 926 controls. The HCV-infected subjects had a higher prevalence of diabetes, anaemia, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/asthma, cirrhosis, hepatitis B and cancer, but had a lower prevalence of coronary artery disease and stroke. The prevalence of all psychiatric comorbidities and substance abuse was higher in the HCV-infected subjects. In the HCV-infected persons, the odds of being diagnosed with congestive heart failure, diabetes, anaemia, hypertension, COPD/asthma, cirrhosis, hepatitis B and cancer were higher, but lower for coronary artery disease and stroke. After adjusting for alcohol and drug abuse and dependence, the odds of psychiatric illness were not higher in the HCV-infected persons. The prevalence and patterns of comorbidities in HCV-infected veterans are different from those in HCV-uninfected controls. The association between HCV and psychiatric diagnoses is at least partly attributable to alcohol and drug abuse and dependence. These factors should be taken into account when evaluating patients for treatment and designing new intervention strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)890-896
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Viral Hepatitis
Volume14
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Veterans
Hepacivirus
Substance-Related Disorders
Psychiatry
Alcoholism
Comorbidity
International Classification of Diseases
Hepatitis B
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Anemia
Coronary Artery Disease
Fibrosis
Asthma
Stroke
Hypertension
Chronic Hepatitis C
Virus Diseases
Mental Disorders
Neoplasms
Patient Care

Keywords

  • Comorbidities
  • Drug abuse
  • HCV
  • Psychiatric illness
  • Substance abuse
  • Veterans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Virology

Cite this

Co-morbid medical and psychiatric illness and substance abuse in HCV-infected and uninfected veterans. / Butt, A. A.; Khan, U. A.; McGinnis, K. A.; Skanderson, M.; Kwoh, Chian K.

In: Journal of Viral Hepatitis, Vol. 14, No. 12, 12.2007, p. 890-896.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Butt, A. A. ; Khan, U. A. ; McGinnis, K. A. ; Skanderson, M. ; Kwoh, Chian K. / Co-morbid medical and psychiatric illness and substance abuse in HCV-infected and uninfected veterans. In: Journal of Viral Hepatitis. 2007 ; Vol. 14, No. 12. pp. 890-896.
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