Cognitive mediation of rape's mental, physical, and social health impact: Tests of four models in cross-sectional data

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

124 Scopus citations

Abstract

Four nested, theoretically specified, increasingly complex models were tested representing cognitive mediation of rape's effects on mental, physical, and social health. Data were cross-sectional (N = 253 rape survivors). Outcomes were standardized assessments of social maladjustment, physical, and psychological symptoms, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The best-fitting model was not fully cognitively mediated. Personological and rape characteristics influenced the level of self-blame experienced and the intensity of maladaptive beliefs about self and others. Self-blame and maladaptive beliefs predicted psychological distress, which strongly influenced all health outcomes. Self-ratings of rape memory characteristics contributed little to predicting postrape distress. The model accounted for 56% of the variance in general distress, including 91% of psychological symptom severity; 54% of PTSD symptoms; 65% of social maladjustment; and 17% of physical symptoms. Longitudinal replication is planned.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)926-941
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
Volume70
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cognitive mediation of rape's mental, physical, and social health impact: Tests of four models in cross-sectional data'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this