Collective action for water harvesting irrigation in the Lerma-Chapala Basin, Mexico

Christopher A Scott, Paula Silva-Ochoa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Water and watersheds are difficult to separate for management purposes. Providing irrigation as a supplement to rainfall for crop production requires considerable collective action at the watershed level to mobilize labor and other resources, as well as to make decisions and implement the distribution of benefits. Small-scale water harvesting irrigation systems in Mexico have endured for centuries. They now face considerable challenges with changes in the ejido property rights over land and water, the growing importance of alternative sources of livelihoods, and increasing scarcity and competition for water within the river basins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)555-572
Number of pages18
JournalWater Policy
Volume3
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

collective action
irrigation
collective behavior
Mexico
water
basin
watershed
property rights
irrigation system
right of ownership
crop production
livelihood
supplement
river basin
labor
river
rainfall
resource
management
resources

Keywords

  • Collective action
  • Irrigation
  • Mexico
  • Property rights
  • Water
  • Water harvesting
  • Watershed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Collective action for water harvesting irrigation in the Lerma-Chapala Basin, Mexico. / Scott, Christopher A; Silva-Ochoa, Paula.

In: Water Policy, Vol. 3, No. 6, 2001, p. 555-572.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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