Communicating Party Labels and Names on Twitter During the 2016 Presidential Invisible Primary and Primary Campaigns

Kate M Kenski, Christine R. Filer, Bethany A. Conway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the use of party and ideological labels and candidate names in major party candidate tweets (N = 94,310) during the 2016 presidential preprimary and primary campaigns to understand the extent to which candidates focused on intraparty and interparty themes as a part of their marketing strategies. The results show that the candidates and their campaigns did not engage in heavy partisan labeling to cultivate their social media identities. Outsider candidates were not more likely to use party or ideological labels in their tweets than insider candidates were. The candidates focused on self-advocacy in their tweets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-23
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Political Marketing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 8 2017

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Keywords

  • invisible primary
  • party labels
  • presidential primary
  • social media
  • Twitter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Marketing

Cite this

Communicating Party Labels and Names on Twitter During the 2016 Presidential Invisible Primary and Primary Campaigns. / Kenski, Kate M; Filer, Christine R.; Conway, Bethany A.

In: Journal of Political Marketing, 08.10.2017, p. 1-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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