Communication media use in the grandparent-grandchild relationship

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study surveyed college-aged grandchildren as to the frequency of their communication with a grandparent using various media. Face-to-face (FtF) and telephone communication were used more frequently than written media, but all were used fairly frequently. Communication using all media was more frequent when the grandparent or grandchild initiated interaction as opposed to the parent. Relationships in which the grandparent initiated contact featured more use of written media (letters, e-mail, cards). Frequency of communication using all media was positively associated with relational quality. Telephone communication best predicted relational quality when use of other media was controlled. In this paper, I discuss implications for media richness theory, the communication predicament of aging model, and future research on grandparent-grandchild relationships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-78
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Communication
Volume50
Issue number4
StatePublished - Sep 2000
Externally publishedYes

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communication media
grandchild
communication
Communication
Telephone
telephone
media theory
e-mail
Grandparents
Communication Media
Media Use
parents
Aging of materials
contact
interaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

Cite this

Communication media use in the grandparent-grandchild relationship. / Harwood, James T.

In: Journal of Communication, Vol. 50, No. 4, 09.2000, p. 56-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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