Comorbidity: Reconsidering the Unit of Analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this short essay, I wish to briefly discuss smoking, polypharmacy, the human biome and multispecies relations, and biomedicalization as a means of stretching the common ways we think about comorbidity. My intent is to expand our thinking about comorbidity and multimorbidity beyond the individual as a unit of analysis, to reframe comorbidity in relation to trajectories of risk, and to address comorbid states of our own making when the treatment of one health problem results in the experience of additional health problems. I do so as a corrective to what I see as an overly narrow focus on comorbidity as co-occurring illnesses within a single individual, and as a complement to critical medical anthropological assessments of synergistic comorbid conditions (syndemics) occurring in structurally vulnerable populations living in environments of risk exposed to macro and micro pathogenic agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)536-544
Number of pages9
JournalMedical Anthropology Quarterly
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

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comorbidity
Comorbidity
Polypharmacy
health
Anthropology
Health
smoking
Vulnerable Populations
illness
Ecosystem
Smoking
experience

Keywords

  • comorbidity
  • multimorbidity
  • syndemics
  • trajectories of risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • Anthropology

Cite this

Comorbidity : Reconsidering the Unit of Analysis. / Nichter, Mark.

In: Medical Anthropology Quarterly, Vol. 30, No. 4, 01.12.2016, p. 536-544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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