Comparing the satisfaction of low back pain patients randomized to receive medical or chiropractic care: Results from the UCLA low-back pain study

Ruth P. Hertzman-Miller, Hal Morgenstern, Eric L. Hurwitz, Fei Yu, Alan H. Adams, Philip Harber, Gerald F. Kominski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

62 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. This study examined the difference in satisfaction between patients assigned to chiropractic vs medical care for treatment of low back pain in a managed care organization. Methods. Satisfaction scores (on a 10-50 scale) after 4 weeks of follow-up were compared among 672 patients randomized to receive medical or chiropractic care. Results. The mean satisfaction score for chiropractic patients was greater than the score for medical patients (crude difference=5.5; 95% confidence interval=4.5, 6.5). Self-care advice and explanation of treatment predicted satisfaction and reduced the estimated difference between chiropractic and medical patients' satisfaction. Conclusions. Communication of advice and information to patients with low back pain increases their satisfaction with providers and accounts for much of the difference between chiropractic and medical patients' satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1628-1633
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume92
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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