Comparison between Dietary Assessment Methods for Determining Associations between Nutrient Intakes and Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Women

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Abstract

It is important to identify the role of nutrition in the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. The goal of this study was to compare the equivalency of nutrient intakes assessed by diet records and the Arizona Food Frequency Questionnaire and the associations of these nutrients with bone mineral density (BMD). This is a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data that was analyzed from six cohorts (fall 1995 to fall 1997) of postmenopausal women (n=244; 55.7±4.6 years) participating in a 12-month, block-randomized, clinical trial. One-year dietary intakes were assessed using 8 days of diet records and the Arizona Food Frequency Questionnaire. Participants' BMD was measured at the lumbar spine (L2-L4), femur trochanter, femur neck, Ward's triangle, and total body using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Linear regression analyses (P≤0.05) were adjusted for the effects of exercise, hormone therapy use, body weight at 1 year, years post menopause, and total energy intake. Significant correlations (r=0.30 to 0.70, P≤0.05) between dietary assessment methods were found with all dietary intake variables. Iron and magnesium were consistently and significantly positively associated with BMD at all bone sites regardless of the dietary assessment method. Zinc, dietary calcium, phosphorous, potassium, total calcium, and fiber intakes were positively associated with BMD at three or more of the same bone sites regardless of the dietary assessment method. Protein, alcohol, caffeine, sodium, and vitamin E did not have any similar BMD associations. Diet records and the Arizona Food Frequency Questionnaire are acceptable dietary tools used to determine the associations of particular nutrients and BMD sites in healthy postmenopausal women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)899-904
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume109
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

bone density
nutrient intake
Bone Density
Diet Records
Food
food frequency questionnaires
femur
Femur
food intake
postmenopause
methodology
bones
diet
Postmenopause
lumbar spine
calcium
Bone and Bones
Exercise Therapy
Dietary Calcium
randomized clinical trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

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title = "Comparison between Dietary Assessment Methods for Determining Associations between Nutrient Intakes and Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Women",
abstract = "It is important to identify the role of nutrition in the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. The goal of this study was to compare the equivalency of nutrient intakes assessed by diet records and the Arizona Food Frequency Questionnaire and the associations of these nutrients with bone mineral density (BMD). This is a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data that was analyzed from six cohorts (fall 1995 to fall 1997) of postmenopausal women (n=244; 55.7±4.6 years) participating in a 12-month, block-randomized, clinical trial. One-year dietary intakes were assessed using 8 days of diet records and the Arizona Food Frequency Questionnaire. Participants' BMD was measured at the lumbar spine (L2-L4), femur trochanter, femur neck, Ward's triangle, and total body using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Linear regression analyses (P≤0.05) were adjusted for the effects of exercise, hormone therapy use, body weight at 1 year, years post menopause, and total energy intake. Significant correlations (r=0.30 to 0.70, P≤0.05) between dietary assessment methods were found with all dietary intake variables. Iron and magnesium were consistently and significantly positively associated with BMD at all bone sites regardless of the dietary assessment method. Zinc, dietary calcium, phosphorous, potassium, total calcium, and fiber intakes were positively associated with BMD at three or more of the same bone sites regardless of the dietary assessment method. Protein, alcohol, caffeine, sodium, and vitamin E did not have any similar BMD associations. Diet records and the Arizona Food Frequency Questionnaire are acceptable dietary tools used to determine the associations of particular nutrients and BMD sites in healthy postmenopausal women.",
author = "Farrell, {Vanessa A} and Margaret Harris and Lohman, {Timothy G} and Going, {Scott B} and Cynthia Thomson and Weber, {Judith L.} and Houtkooper, {Linda K}",
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T1 - Comparison between Dietary Assessment Methods for Determining Associations between Nutrient Intakes and Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Women

AU - Farrell, Vanessa A

AU - Harris, Margaret

AU - Lohman, Timothy G

AU - Going, Scott B

AU - Thomson, Cynthia

AU - Weber, Judith L.

AU - Houtkooper, Linda K

PY - 2009/5

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N2 - It is important to identify the role of nutrition in the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. The goal of this study was to compare the equivalency of nutrient intakes assessed by diet records and the Arizona Food Frequency Questionnaire and the associations of these nutrients with bone mineral density (BMD). This is a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data that was analyzed from six cohorts (fall 1995 to fall 1997) of postmenopausal women (n=244; 55.7±4.6 years) participating in a 12-month, block-randomized, clinical trial. One-year dietary intakes were assessed using 8 days of diet records and the Arizona Food Frequency Questionnaire. Participants' BMD was measured at the lumbar spine (L2-L4), femur trochanter, femur neck, Ward's triangle, and total body using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Linear regression analyses (P≤0.05) were adjusted for the effects of exercise, hormone therapy use, body weight at 1 year, years post menopause, and total energy intake. Significant correlations (r=0.30 to 0.70, P≤0.05) between dietary assessment methods were found with all dietary intake variables. Iron and magnesium were consistently and significantly positively associated with BMD at all bone sites regardless of the dietary assessment method. Zinc, dietary calcium, phosphorous, potassium, total calcium, and fiber intakes were positively associated with BMD at three or more of the same bone sites regardless of the dietary assessment method. Protein, alcohol, caffeine, sodium, and vitamin E did not have any similar BMD associations. Diet records and the Arizona Food Frequency Questionnaire are acceptable dietary tools used to determine the associations of particular nutrients and BMD sites in healthy postmenopausal women.

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