Comparison of Conventional and Computed Radiography: Assessment of Image Quality and Reader Performance in Skeletal Extremity Trauma

Pamela J. Lund, Elizabeth A. Krupinski, Scott Pereles, Brent Mockbee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rationale and Objectives. Reader performance and image quality were assessed for standard film, computed film, and computer monitor radiography viewing formats in the evaluation of skeletal extremity trauma. Materials and Methods. Three radiologists and three orthopedic surgeons interpreted 27 skeletal radiographs obtained with equivalent technical parameters. Readers evaluated standard film, computed film, and computer monitor formats randomly for fracture and soft-tissue abnormalities. Sessions were videotaped, and eye motion was recorded. Results. No statistically significant differences were found between image formats for true-positive or false-positive findings of trauma indicators. Findings were classified as false-negative based on eye position fixation times. Search errors (lesion not fixated) accounted for 21.7%, 20.6%, and 17.1% of false-negative errors with the computer monitor, computed film, and standard film formats, respectively. Combined recognition errors and decision errors were 78.3%, 79.4%, and 82.9%, respectively. Viewing times were longest for the computer monitor images (P < .001). Image quality, contrast, and sharpness were rated highest for computed radiographs (P = .001). Radiologists had a higher true-positive decision rate than orthopedic surgeons (P = .03). Conclusion. No statistically significant differences were seen in reader performance among viewing formats. The computed film format received the highest quality rating, and workstation viewing times were longest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)570-576
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic radiology
Volume4
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1997

Keywords

  • Bones, radiography
  • Images, display
  • Images, interpretation
  • Radiography, comparative studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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