Comparison of coronary arteriographic and left ventriculographic findings in patients with single, double, and triple vessel disease and angina pectoris

W. V R Vieweg, S. E. Warren, Joseph S Alpert, A. D. Hagan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The distribution and severity of coronary artery disease and degree of left ventricular dysfunction are described in 500 patients with single (103), double (119), and triple (278) vessel disease and angina pectoris. The coronary arterial patterns were divided into right (360), mixed (89), and left (51) systems, depending upon the blood supply to the inferior surface of the left ventricle. The following relationships were noted: Coronary arterial patterns of right, mixed, and left systems do not influence the presence, distribution, or severity of coronary arterial lesions among patients with single, double, and triple vessel disease and angina pectoris. Analysis of the distribution of lesions among patients with single and double vessel disease reveals that the circumflex/obtuse marginal arteries contribute least of the three major coronary arteries to angina pectoris. Lesions of 70-90% reduction in coronary arterial luminal diameter are the most common, and 90-99% lesions are the least common. The latter are least stable among patients with both coronary artery disease and angina pectoris. Quantitatively there is progression of both coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction as one moves from single to double and then to triple vessel disease. However, the pattern of coronary arterial lesions (50-70%, 70-90%, 90-99%, and 100% reduction of luminal diameter) and the pattern of left ventricular dyssynergy (hypokinesis, akinesis, and dyskinesis) are similar among the patients with single, double, and triple vessel disease and angina pectoris.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-164
Number of pages10
JournalCatheterization and Cardiovascular Diagnosis
Volume7
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1981
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Angina Pectoris
Coronary Artery Disease
Left Ventricular Dysfunction
Heart Ventricles
Coronary Vessels
Arteries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{233895ab7bc8416da5eb9c2ebce69e63,
title = "Comparison of coronary arteriographic and left ventriculographic findings in patients with single, double, and triple vessel disease and angina pectoris",
abstract = "The distribution and severity of coronary artery disease and degree of left ventricular dysfunction are described in 500 patients with single (103), double (119), and triple (278) vessel disease and angina pectoris. The coronary arterial patterns were divided into right (360), mixed (89), and left (51) systems, depending upon the blood supply to the inferior surface of the left ventricle. The following relationships were noted: Coronary arterial patterns of right, mixed, and left systems do not influence the presence, distribution, or severity of coronary arterial lesions among patients with single, double, and triple vessel disease and angina pectoris. Analysis of the distribution of lesions among patients with single and double vessel disease reveals that the circumflex/obtuse marginal arteries contribute least of the three major coronary arteries to angina pectoris. Lesions of 70-90{\%} reduction in coronary arterial luminal diameter are the most common, and 90-99{\%} lesions are the least common. The latter are least stable among patients with both coronary artery disease and angina pectoris. Quantitatively there is progression of both coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction as one moves from single to double and then to triple vessel disease. However, the pattern of coronary arterial lesions (50-70{\%}, 70-90{\%}, 90-99{\%}, and 100{\%} reduction of luminal diameter) and the pattern of left ventricular dyssynergy (hypokinesis, akinesis, and dyskinesis) are similar among the patients with single, double, and triple vessel disease and angina pectoris.",
author = "Vieweg, {W. V R} and Warren, {S. E.} and Alpert, {Joseph S} and Hagan, {A. D.}",
year = "1981",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "155--164",
journal = "Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions",
issn = "1522-1946",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of coronary arteriographic and left ventriculographic findings in patients with single, double, and triple vessel disease and angina pectoris

AU - Vieweg, W. V R

AU - Warren, S. E.

AU - Alpert, Joseph S

AU - Hagan, A. D.

PY - 1981

Y1 - 1981

N2 - The distribution and severity of coronary artery disease and degree of left ventricular dysfunction are described in 500 patients with single (103), double (119), and triple (278) vessel disease and angina pectoris. The coronary arterial patterns were divided into right (360), mixed (89), and left (51) systems, depending upon the blood supply to the inferior surface of the left ventricle. The following relationships were noted: Coronary arterial patterns of right, mixed, and left systems do not influence the presence, distribution, or severity of coronary arterial lesions among patients with single, double, and triple vessel disease and angina pectoris. Analysis of the distribution of lesions among patients with single and double vessel disease reveals that the circumflex/obtuse marginal arteries contribute least of the three major coronary arteries to angina pectoris. Lesions of 70-90% reduction in coronary arterial luminal diameter are the most common, and 90-99% lesions are the least common. The latter are least stable among patients with both coronary artery disease and angina pectoris. Quantitatively there is progression of both coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction as one moves from single to double and then to triple vessel disease. However, the pattern of coronary arterial lesions (50-70%, 70-90%, 90-99%, and 100% reduction of luminal diameter) and the pattern of left ventricular dyssynergy (hypokinesis, akinesis, and dyskinesis) are similar among the patients with single, double, and triple vessel disease and angina pectoris.

AB - The distribution and severity of coronary artery disease and degree of left ventricular dysfunction are described in 500 patients with single (103), double (119), and triple (278) vessel disease and angina pectoris. The coronary arterial patterns were divided into right (360), mixed (89), and left (51) systems, depending upon the blood supply to the inferior surface of the left ventricle. The following relationships were noted: Coronary arterial patterns of right, mixed, and left systems do not influence the presence, distribution, or severity of coronary arterial lesions among patients with single, double, and triple vessel disease and angina pectoris. Analysis of the distribution of lesions among patients with single and double vessel disease reveals that the circumflex/obtuse marginal arteries contribute least of the three major coronary arteries to angina pectoris. Lesions of 70-90% reduction in coronary arterial luminal diameter are the most common, and 90-99% lesions are the least common. The latter are least stable among patients with both coronary artery disease and angina pectoris. Quantitatively there is progression of both coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction as one moves from single to double and then to triple vessel disease. However, the pattern of coronary arterial lesions (50-70%, 70-90%, 90-99%, and 100% reduction of luminal diameter) and the pattern of left ventricular dyssynergy (hypokinesis, akinesis, and dyskinesis) are similar among the patients with single, double, and triple vessel disease and angina pectoris.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0019862431&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0019862431&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7296664

AN - SCOPUS:0019862431

VL - 7

SP - 155

EP - 164

JO - Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions

JF - Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions

SN - 1522-1946

IS - 2

ER -