Comparison of high-frequency jet ventilation with conventional mechanical ventilation in saline-lavaged rabbits

Stuart F Quan, H. W. Militzer, J. M. Calkins, Richard E Sobonya, C. K. Waterson, Charles W Otto, T. J. Conahan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

A surfactant-depletion lung-injury model was produced in 37 New Zealand white rabbits by saline lavage. During the next 2 to 3 h, rabbits were ventilated with conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV, group 1), high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV, group 2), or CMV for 1 h followed by HFJV for 2 h (CMV/HFJV, group 3). Survival until planned termination of the protocol was 56%, 77%, and 63% in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Causes of early demise were usually pneumothorax or metabolic acidosis. There were no statistically significant differences among the groups with respect to survival, incidence of pneumothorax or metabolic acidosis. Arterial oxygenation was more efficient with HFJV (group 2) (P[A-a]O2 = 372 ± 51 torr [mean ± SE] at 2 h) than with CMV (group 1) (P[A-a]O2 = 512 ± 18 torr at 2 h, p < .01). Furthermore, oxygen gas exchange in 3 of 5 group 3 rabbits improved after institution of HFJV. In contrast to previous findings with high-frequency oscillation (HFO), there were no qualitative histologic differences between lungs ventilated with HFJV vs. CMV. Thus, although HFJV produced more efficient gas exchange in this model, it did not improve pulmonary pathology. HFO may be preferable to HFJV in infant respiratory distress syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)759-763
Number of pages5
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume12
Issue number9
StatePublished - 1984

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High-Frequency Jet Ventilation
Artificial Respiration
Pneumothorax
Rabbits
Acidosis
Gases
Newborn Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Lung
Therapeutic Irrigation
Lung Injury
Surface-Active Agents
Pathology
Oxygen
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Comparison of high-frequency jet ventilation with conventional mechanical ventilation in saline-lavaged rabbits. / Quan, Stuart F; Militzer, H. W.; Calkins, J. M.; Sobonya, Richard E; Waterson, C. K.; Otto, Charles W; Conahan, T. J.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 9, 1984, p. 759-763.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "A surfactant-depletion lung-injury model was produced in 37 New Zealand white rabbits by saline lavage. During the next 2 to 3 h, rabbits were ventilated with conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV, group 1), high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV, group 2), or CMV for 1 h followed by HFJV for 2 h (CMV/HFJV, group 3). Survival until planned termination of the protocol was 56{\%}, 77{\%}, and 63{\%} in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Causes of early demise were usually pneumothorax or metabolic acidosis. There were no statistically significant differences among the groups with respect to survival, incidence of pneumothorax or metabolic acidosis. Arterial oxygenation was more efficient with HFJV (group 2) (P[A-a]O2 = 372 ± 51 torr [mean ± SE] at 2 h) than with CMV (group 1) (P[A-a]O2 = 512 ± 18 torr at 2 h, p < .01). Furthermore, oxygen gas exchange in 3 of 5 group 3 rabbits improved after institution of HFJV. In contrast to previous findings with high-frequency oscillation (HFO), there were no qualitative histologic differences between lungs ventilated with HFJV vs. CMV. Thus, although HFJV produced more efficient gas exchange in this model, it did not improve pulmonary pathology. HFO may be preferable to HFJV in infant respiratory distress syndrome.",
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AU - Quan, Stuart F

AU - Militzer, H. W.

AU - Calkins, J. M.

AU - Sobonya, Richard E

AU - Waterson, C. K.

AU - Otto, Charles W

AU - Conahan, T. J.

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