Comparison of the reusable standard glide scope® video laryngoscope and the disposable cobalt glide scope® video laryngoscope for tracheal intubation in an academic emergency department: A retrospective review

John C. Sakles, Asad E. Patanwala, Jarrod Mosier, John Dicken, Nathan Holman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives The objective was to compare the first-pass success and clinical performance characteristics of the reusable standard GlideScope® video laryngoscope (sGVL) and the disposable Cobalt GlideScope® video laryngoscope (cGVL). Methods This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data recorded into a continuous quality improvement database at an urban academic emergency department (ED). The intent of the database is to evaluate operator performance and to track practice patterns used for intubation in the ED. Between July 1, 2007, and June 30, 2013, operators recorded all consecutive intubations performed in the ED. The database included patient demographics and detailed information about each intubation, such as device(s) used, reason for device selection, method of intubation, difficult airway characteristics, number of intubation attempts, and outcome of each attempt. The operator also evaluated the presence of lens fogging and extent of lens contamination. The primary outcome measure was first-pass success. Secondary outcome measures were ultimate success, Cormack-Lehane (CL) view of the airway, presence of lens fogging, and extent of lens contamination. Only adult patients age 18 years or older intubated with the sGVL or cGVL using a stylet, and who had data forms completed at the time of intubation, were included in this study. Results A total of 583 intubations were included in the study, 504 with the sGVL and 79 with cGVL. First pass success was achieved in 81.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 77.3% to 84.3%) of patients in the sGVL group and in 58.2% (95% CI = 46.6% to 69.2%) of patients in the cGVL group. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, the sGVL was associated with a higher first pass success than the cGVL (odds ratio [OR] = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.9 to 5.8). The ultimate success of the sGVL was 92.1% (95% CI = 89.4% to 94.3%) and the cGVL was 72.2% (95% CI = 60.9% to 81.7%). A CL grade I or II view was obtained in 93.2% (95% CI = 90.7% to 95.3%) in the sGVL group and 86.1% (95% CI = 76.5% to 92.8%) in the cGVL group. Lens fogging occurred in 33.3% (95% CI = 29.2% to 37.6%) of the cases in the sGVL group and 59.5% (95% CI = 47.9% to 70.4%) of the cases in the cGVL group. Significant lens contamination occurred in 5.0% (95% CI = 3.2% to 7.2%) of the sGVL group and 21.5% (95% CI = 13.1% to 32.2%) of the cGVL group. Conclusions In this observational study, the sGVL had higher first pass and overall success than the disposable cGVL. The cGVL had significantly higher incidence of lens fogging and contamination, which may partially account for its lower success. A prospective randomized trial is needed to confirm these findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)408-415
Number of pages8
JournalAcademic Emergency Medicine
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

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