Competition for nectar between introduced honey bees and native North American bees and ants.

W. M. Schaffer, D. W. Zeh, S. L. Buchmann, S. Kleinhans, M. V. Schaffer, J. Antrim

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Abstract

Previous studies of introduced honey bees foraging at Agave schottii flowers suggest that Apis mellifera preferentially exploits the most productive patches of flowers and thereby reduces the standing crop of available nectar and the utilization of these sites by native bees. Results of experiments undertaken to evaluate this hypothesis are given and discussed using Apis, Bombus and Xylocopa. -Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)564-577
Number of pages14
JournalEcology
Volume64
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

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    Schaffer, W. M., Zeh, D. W., Buchmann, S. L., Kleinhans, S., Schaffer, M. V., & Antrim, J. (1983). Competition for nectar between introduced honey bees and native North American bees and ants. Ecology, 64(3), 564-577. https://doi.org/10.2307/1939976