Competitiveness and effectiveness of strains of Rhizobium phaseoli isolated from the sonoran desert

K. L. Josephson, Ian L Pepper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Four strains of Rhizobium phaseoli were examined for N2 fixation effectiveness and for competitiveness for nodule occupancy by utilizing strain-specific fluorescent antibodies. Competition studies in Leonard jars held in a growth chamber showed strain KIM-5 (a cool season isolate from Kimberly, Idaho) consistently occupied the majority of nodules on bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cv. Kentucky Wonder, when applied as a mixed inoculant with desert strains (K-1, 36 or 90). Competitiveness of KIM-5 was relatively independent of cell numbers as shown by the high recovery of KIM-5 from nodules, even when extensively outnumbered in the inoculant. KIM-5 out-competed the desert strains regardless of whether they were ineffective (strains 36 and 90) or highly effective (K-1). Although KIM-5 was more competitive than K-l, no difference in infectiveness (as shown by nodule mass) or effectiveness (as shown by % N, total plant N, C2H2 reduction and total plant weight) was observed. In YEM broth, strain K-l showed increasing growth rates when the temperature was increased from 27° to 35°C, and was viable at 40°C. These data indicate K-1 to be an unusually heat-tolerant strain. Growth rates of KIM-5 were constant from 27° to 35°C and the organism was not viable at 40°C. Both strains produced acid in a defined broth medium. The effectiveness of KIM-5 and K-l was also evaluated under field conditions using single strain inoculants with two cultivars of pinto beans (P. vulgaris L.) ev. Mexicali 80 and Delicias 71. Inoculation with K-1 resulted in yield increases with both cultivars over uninoculated plants, whereas there was little difference between KIM-5 inoculated and uninoculated plants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)651-655
Number of pages5
JournalSoil Biology and Biochemistry
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1984

Fingerprint

Rhizobium phaseoli
Sonoran Desert
rhizobacterium
competitiveness
desert
Phaseolus
cultivar
Growth
Nitrogen Fixation
inoculation
Phaseolus vulgaris
antibody
fixation
deserts
Cell Count
Hot Temperature
pinto beans
Weights and Measures
Temperature
Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Biochemistry
  • Ecology

Cite this

Competitiveness and effectiveness of strains of Rhizobium phaseoli isolated from the sonoran desert. / Josephson, K. L.; Pepper, Ian L.

In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, Vol. 16, No. 6, 1984, p. 651-655.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{19b7a3e1e40a42e8b996fe2675a9ce83,
title = "Competitiveness and effectiveness of strains of Rhizobium phaseoli isolated from the sonoran desert",
abstract = "Four strains of Rhizobium phaseoli were examined for N2 fixation effectiveness and for competitiveness for nodule occupancy by utilizing strain-specific fluorescent antibodies. Competition studies in Leonard jars held in a growth chamber showed strain KIM-5 (a cool season isolate from Kimberly, Idaho) consistently occupied the majority of nodules on bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cv. Kentucky Wonder, when applied as a mixed inoculant with desert strains (K-1, 36 or 90). Competitiveness of KIM-5 was relatively independent of cell numbers as shown by the high recovery of KIM-5 from nodules, even when extensively outnumbered in the inoculant. KIM-5 out-competed the desert strains regardless of whether they were ineffective (strains 36 and 90) or highly effective (K-1). Although KIM-5 was more competitive than K-l, no difference in infectiveness (as shown by nodule mass) or effectiveness (as shown by {\%} N, total plant N, C2H2 reduction and total plant weight) was observed. In YEM broth, strain K-l showed increasing growth rates when the temperature was increased from 27° to 35°C, and was viable at 40°C. These data indicate K-1 to be an unusually heat-tolerant strain. Growth rates of KIM-5 were constant from 27° to 35°C and the organism was not viable at 40°C. Both strains produced acid in a defined broth medium. The effectiveness of KIM-5 and K-l was also evaluated under field conditions using single strain inoculants with two cultivars of pinto beans (P. vulgaris L.) ev. Mexicali 80 and Delicias 71. Inoculation with K-1 resulted in yield increases with both cultivars over uninoculated plants, whereas there was little difference between KIM-5 inoculated and uninoculated plants.",
author = "Josephson, {K. L.} and Pepper, {Ian L}",
year = "1984",
doi = "10.1016/0038-0717(84)90086-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "651--655",
journal = "Soil Biology and Biochemistry",
issn = "0038-0717",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Competitiveness and effectiveness of strains of Rhizobium phaseoli isolated from the sonoran desert

AU - Josephson, K. L.

AU - Pepper, Ian L

PY - 1984

Y1 - 1984

N2 - Four strains of Rhizobium phaseoli were examined for N2 fixation effectiveness and for competitiveness for nodule occupancy by utilizing strain-specific fluorescent antibodies. Competition studies in Leonard jars held in a growth chamber showed strain KIM-5 (a cool season isolate from Kimberly, Idaho) consistently occupied the majority of nodules on bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cv. Kentucky Wonder, when applied as a mixed inoculant with desert strains (K-1, 36 or 90). Competitiveness of KIM-5 was relatively independent of cell numbers as shown by the high recovery of KIM-5 from nodules, even when extensively outnumbered in the inoculant. KIM-5 out-competed the desert strains regardless of whether they were ineffective (strains 36 and 90) or highly effective (K-1). Although KIM-5 was more competitive than K-l, no difference in infectiveness (as shown by nodule mass) or effectiveness (as shown by % N, total plant N, C2H2 reduction and total plant weight) was observed. In YEM broth, strain K-l showed increasing growth rates when the temperature was increased from 27° to 35°C, and was viable at 40°C. These data indicate K-1 to be an unusually heat-tolerant strain. Growth rates of KIM-5 were constant from 27° to 35°C and the organism was not viable at 40°C. Both strains produced acid in a defined broth medium. The effectiveness of KIM-5 and K-l was also evaluated under field conditions using single strain inoculants with two cultivars of pinto beans (P. vulgaris L.) ev. Mexicali 80 and Delicias 71. Inoculation with K-1 resulted in yield increases with both cultivars over uninoculated plants, whereas there was little difference between KIM-5 inoculated and uninoculated plants.

AB - Four strains of Rhizobium phaseoli were examined for N2 fixation effectiveness and for competitiveness for nodule occupancy by utilizing strain-specific fluorescent antibodies. Competition studies in Leonard jars held in a growth chamber showed strain KIM-5 (a cool season isolate from Kimberly, Idaho) consistently occupied the majority of nodules on bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cv. Kentucky Wonder, when applied as a mixed inoculant with desert strains (K-1, 36 or 90). Competitiveness of KIM-5 was relatively independent of cell numbers as shown by the high recovery of KIM-5 from nodules, even when extensively outnumbered in the inoculant. KIM-5 out-competed the desert strains regardless of whether they were ineffective (strains 36 and 90) or highly effective (K-1). Although KIM-5 was more competitive than K-l, no difference in infectiveness (as shown by nodule mass) or effectiveness (as shown by % N, total plant N, C2H2 reduction and total plant weight) was observed. In YEM broth, strain K-l showed increasing growth rates when the temperature was increased from 27° to 35°C, and was viable at 40°C. These data indicate K-1 to be an unusually heat-tolerant strain. Growth rates of KIM-5 were constant from 27° to 35°C and the organism was not viable at 40°C. Both strains produced acid in a defined broth medium. The effectiveness of KIM-5 and K-l was also evaluated under field conditions using single strain inoculants with two cultivars of pinto beans (P. vulgaris L.) ev. Mexicali 80 and Delicias 71. Inoculation with K-1 resulted in yield increases with both cultivars over uninoculated plants, whereas there was little difference between KIM-5 inoculated and uninoculated plants.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0001075792&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0001075792&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0038-0717(84)90086-5

DO - 10.1016/0038-0717(84)90086-5

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0001075792

VL - 16

SP - 651

EP - 655

JO - Soil Biology and Biochemistry

JF - Soil Biology and Biochemistry

SN - 0038-0717

IS - 6

ER -