Completing h

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nearly a decade ago, the science community was introduced to the h-index, a proposed statistical measure of the collective impact of the publications of any individual researcher. Of course, any method of reducing a complex data set to a single number will necessarily have certain limitations and introduce certain biases. However, in this paper we point out that the definition of the h-index actually suffers from something far deeper: a hidden mathematical incompleteness intrinsic to its definition. In particular, we point out that one critical step within the definition of h has been missed until now, resulting in an index which only achieves its stated objectives under certain rather limited circumstances. For example, this incompleteness explains why the h-index ultimately has more utility in certain scientific subfields than others. In this paper, we expose the origin of this incompleteness and then also propose a method of completing the definition of h in a way which remains close to its original guiding principle. As a result, our "completed" h not only reduces to the usual h in cases where the h-index already achieves its objectives, but also extends the validity of the h-index into situations where it currently does not.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)385-397
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Informetrics
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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Keywords

  • Citations
  • H-Index
  • Publications

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Management Science and Operations Research
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Completing h. / Dienes, Keith R.

In: Journal of Informetrics, Vol. 9, No. 2, 01.04.2015, p. 385-397.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dienes, Keith R. / Completing h. In: Journal of Informetrics. 2015 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 385-397.
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