Composition and production of California oak savanna seasonally grazed by sheep

J. W. Bartolome, Mitchel McClaran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tested the effects of two seasonal grazing strategies on within- and between-year production and composition in blue oak Quercus douglasii savanna understory and adjacent open annual grassland. Moderate intensity summer-fall-winter and spring-summer sheep use had few within-year effects. Production and composition varied considerably between years in both treatments. Forbs (especially legumes) decreased in open grassland and oak understory between years within both seasonal grazing regimes. This change could not have been caused by selective grazing because there were no corresponding within-year patterns. Instead, between-year changes are more likely related to nonselective effects of stocking rate and/or weather. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-107
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Range Management
Volume45
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Quercus douglasii
sheep
savanna
savannas
Quercus
grazing
understory
grassland
annual grasslands
summer
forbs
stocking rate
weather
legumes
grasslands
winter
oak
effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Composition and production of California oak savanna seasonally grazed by sheep. / Bartolome, J. W.; McClaran, Mitchel.

In: Journal of Range Management, Vol. 45, No. 1, 1992, p. 103-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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