Computergestützte quantitative Textanalyse: Äquivalenz und Robustheit der deutschen Version des Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count

Translated title of the contribution: Computer-aided quantitative textanalysis: Equivalence and reliability of the German adaptation of the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count

Markus Wolf, Andrea B. Horn, Matthias R. Mehl, Severin Haug, James W. Pennebaker, Hans Kordy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Scopus citations

Abstract

We introduce the German adaptation of the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC), a computer-aided dictionary-based text analysis program. The LIWC was developed by Pennebaker and colleagues (2001) to analyze essays in the context of expressive writing experiments. Two studies on the performance of the German LIWC are reported: (1) The equivalence of the original LIWC version and the German dictionary is investigated in a sample of N = 122 bilingual text units. (2) In a sample of N = 104 E-Mails, the robustness of the LIWC categories with respect to typing errors is analyzed. The results show that most of the LIWC categories display high equivalence to their English counterparts. Furthermore, the LIWC is found to be reliable with regard to the typing quality of E-Mails. The findings indicate the usefulness of the LIWC for analyzing German texts. The reliability of the LIWC highlights its usefulness particularly for the analysis of natural language from computer-mediated communication.

Translated title of the contributionComputer-aided quantitative textanalysis: Equivalence and reliability of the German adaptation of the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count
Original languageGerman
Pages (from-to)85-98
Number of pages14
JournalDiagnostica
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 24 2008

Keywords

  • Computer mediated communication
  • Computer-aided text analysis
  • Equivalence
  • Linguistic Inquiry and word count
  • Multimethod assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

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