Computer program ATOM-MOL-nonBO for performing calculations of ground and excited states of atoms and molecules without assuming the Born-Oppenheimer approximation using all-particle complex explicitly correlated Gaussian functions

Sergiy Bubin, Ludwik Adamowicz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this work, we describe a computer program called ATOM-MOL-nonBO for performing bound state calculations of small atoms and molecules without assuming the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. All particles forming the systems, electrons and nuclei, are treated on equal footing. The wave functions of the bound states are expanded in terms of all-particle one-center complex explicitly correlated Gaussian functions multiplied by Cartesian angular factors. As these Gaussian functions are eigenfunctions of the operator representing the square of the total angular momentum of the system, the problem separates and calculations of states corresponding to different values of the total rotational quantum number can be solved independently from each other. Due to thorough variational optimization of the Gaussian exponential parameters, the method allows us to generate very accurate wave functions. The optimization is aided by analytically calculated energy gradient determined with respect to the parameters. Three examples of calculations performed for diatomic and triatomic molecules are shown as an illustration of calculations that can be performed with this program. Finally, we discuss the limitations, applicability range, and bottlenecks of the program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalThe Journal of chemical physics
Volume152
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - May 29 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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