CONFLICTING INFORMATION, ATTITUDE, AND MESSAGE VARIABLES AS PREDICTORS OF LEARNING AND PERSUASION1

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the effects of conflicting information in two messages about the same topic on recall of, and post favorability toward the message. Three multiple regression analyses tested the relationship among conflicting information, initial attitude, attitude change, salience, message clarity, and adequacy of support in predicting recall and post favorability. Six hypotheses were supported. Both recall and post favorability were inhibited when conflicting information was present. Attitudes and message variables were significant predictors of learning and post favorability. Proactive inhibition produced more interference than retroactive inhibition. Results are discussed in terms of the interrelatedness of the learning and persuasion processes and the ability of interference theory to predict outcomes in both paradigms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-144
Number of pages12
JournalHuman Communication Research
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1975
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Learning
Proactive Inhibition
interference
learning
Persuasive Communication
Aptitude
attitude change
persuasion
Regression Analysis
paradigm
regression
ability
Inhibition (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Anthropology
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

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abstract = "This study examined the effects of conflicting information in two messages about the same topic on recall of, and post favorability toward the message. Three multiple regression analyses tested the relationship among conflicting information, initial attitude, attitude change, salience, message clarity, and adequacy of support in predicting recall and post favorability. Six hypotheses were supported. Both recall and post favorability were inhibited when conflicting information was present. Attitudes and message variables were significant predictors of learning and post favorability. Proactive inhibition produced more interference than retroactive inhibition. Results are discussed in terms of the interrelatedness of the learning and persuasion processes and the ability of interference theory to predict outcomes in both paradigms.",
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AB - This study examined the effects of conflicting information in two messages about the same topic on recall of, and post favorability toward the message. Three multiple regression analyses tested the relationship among conflicting information, initial attitude, attitude change, salience, message clarity, and adequacy of support in predicting recall and post favorability. Six hypotheses were supported. Both recall and post favorability were inhibited when conflicting information was present. Attitudes and message variables were significant predictors of learning and post favorability. Proactive inhibition produced more interference than retroactive inhibition. Results are discussed in terms of the interrelatedness of the learning and persuasion processes and the ability of interference theory to predict outcomes in both paradigms.

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