Connecting with others in the midst of stressful upheaval on September 11, 2001

Patricia Liehr, Matthias R Mehl, Linda C. Summers, James W. Pennebaker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was originally planned from September tenth through twelfth to assess concurrent use of three real-time data sources during a usual day. When the World Trade Center towers collapsed, the plan expanded to describe 24-hour blood pressure and heart rate, natural environment word use, television viewing/radio listening, and self-reported diary feelings for six undergraduate students in the midst of stressful upheaval. Heart rate, "we" word-use and television viewing/radio listening increased over time. Higher negative and lower positive feelings/emotions occurred during morning hours on September 11. Students connected with others and shared good thoughts. Measurement with real-time data sources was informative.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2-9
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Nursing Research
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Emotions
Information Storage and Retrieval
Television
Radio
Heart Rate
Students
Blood Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Connecting with others in the midst of stressful upheaval on September 11, 2001. / Liehr, Patricia; Mehl, Matthias R; Summers, Linda C.; Pennebaker, James W.

In: Applied Nursing Research, Vol. 17, No. 1, 02.2004, p. 2-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liehr, Patricia ; Mehl, Matthias R ; Summers, Linda C. ; Pennebaker, James W. / Connecting with others in the midst of stressful upheaval on September 11, 2001. In: Applied Nursing Research. 2004 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 2-9.
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