Conserving transborder migratory bats, preserving nature's benefits to humans: The lesson from North America's bird conservation treaties

Laura López-Hoffman, Charles C. Chester, Robert Merideth

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

In 2015, Canada, the United States, and Mexico signed a letter of intent to protect the continent's migratory bats. In charting a path for protecting bats, we look to the century of efforts to protect birds. Despite a barrage of obstacles, millions of migratory birds still cross North America each year. One key reason for their survival has been international cooperation. The past year marks the 100th anniversary of the Migratory Bird Treaty between Canada and the United States, as well as the 80th anniversary of a similar agreement between the United States and Mexico. These treaties were based on the practical benefits from migratory birds-values today known as ecosystem services. Migratory bats also provide significant natural benefits to people; a fully fledged international convention on migratory bats would not only protect these benefits but would also celebrate a century of transborder cooperation to conserve migratory species in North America.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)321-322
Number of pages2
JournalBioScience
Volume67
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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