Considering the roles of affect and culture in the enactment and enjoyment of cruelty

Spee Kosloff, Jeff L Greenberg, Sheldon Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research on aggression and terror management theory suggests shortcomings in Nell's analysis of cruelty. Hostile aggression and exposure to aggressive cues are not inherently reinforcing, though they may be enjoyed if construed within a meaningful cultural framework. Terror management research suggests that human cruelty stems from the desire to defend one's cultural worldview and to participate in a heroic triumph over evil.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-232
Number of pages2
JournalBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006

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aggression
Aggression
research management
Research
Cues
stems
exposure
WorldView
analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Considering the roles of affect and culture in the enactment and enjoyment of cruelty. / Kosloff, Spee; Greenberg, Jeff L; Solomon, Sheldon.

In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Vol. 29, No. 3, 06.2006, p. 231-232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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