Contact Lens surface deposits increase the adhesion of pseudomonas aeruginosa

Salim I. Butrus, Stephen A Klotz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Soft contact lenses are bathed with tear components during wear and surface deposits accumulate. This report shows that Pseudomonas aeruginosa adheres to the surface of worn extended wear contact lenses in direct proportion to the amount of lens surface deposits as determined by the Rudko method (P < 05). More hydrophobic bacteria adhered 10 times greater than bacteria which were relatively hydrophilic (P < 005). The effect upon bacterial adhesion of enzyme and surfactant cleaning of worn extended wear contact lenses was investigated by two independent methods: one involving a high inoculum and the other a low inoculum of Pseudomonas. Treatment of worn lenses with commercially available enzymes such as papain and pork pancreatin as well as treatment with neuraminidase, mannosidase, glucosidase and alkylcarboxylic acid for as long as 48 hours failed to reduce subsequent bacterial adhesion in both the high and low inoculum experiments. We conclude that soft contact lens surface deposits are a major determinant in the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the worn lens surface and that enzyme cleaning of worn lenses does not significantly reduce bacterial adhesion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)717-724
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Eye Research
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Contact Lenses
Bacterial Adhesion
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Lenses
Extended-Wear Contact Lenses
Hydrophilic Contact Lens
Enzymes
Mannosidases
Pancreatin
Glucosidases
Bacteria
Papain
Neuraminidase
Pseudomonas
Tears
Surface-Active Agents
Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Contact Lens surface deposits increase the adhesion of pseudomonas aeruginosa. / Butrus, Salim I.; Klotz, Stephen A.

In: Current Eye Research, Vol. 9, No. 8, 1990, p. 717-724.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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