Continuous recombinant bacterial fermentations utilizing selective flocculation and recycle

Kimberly L Ogden, Robert H. Davis, Austin L. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Selective recycle has successfully been used to maintain an unstable plasmid-bearing bacterial strain as dominant in a continuous reactor, whereas the culture reverts to 100% segregant cells when selective recycle is not used. The plasmid-bearing strain is slower growing and flocculent; however, when the cells lose their plasmid, the resulting segregant cells are nonflocculent and grow at a faster rate due to their decreased metabolic burden. Both types of cells exit a chemostat and enter an inclined settler where the flocculent plasmid-bearing cells are separated from the nonflocculent segregant cells by differential sedimentation. The underflow from the cell separator, which is enriched with plasmid-bearing cells, is recycled back to the chemostat, while the segregant cells are withdrawn off the top of the settler and discarded.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7-12
Number of pages6
JournalBiotechnology Progress
Volume6
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Flocculation
flocculation
Fermentation
fermentation
plasmids
Plasmids
cells
separators

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Biotechnology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Continuous recombinant bacterial fermentations utilizing selective flocculation and recycle. / Ogden, Kimberly L; Davis, Robert H.; Taylor, Austin L.

In: Biotechnology Progress, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.1990, p. 7-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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