Continuous transtracheal oxygen delivery during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. An alternative method of ventilation in a canine model

F. K. Branditz, Karl B Kern, S. C. Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adequate oxygenation of apneic subjects can be maintained by constant flow transtracheal oxygen (TTO), but this method alone is associated with hypercapnia. The 'bellows' effect of external chest compressions (ECC) might prevent this problem if the airway were kept open by TTO. In dogs, we investigated the utility of TTO delivered at 15 L/min by a percutaneously placed intratracheal catheter, plus ECC (TTO/ECC) as an alternative method of ventilation during CPR. TTO was applied to anesthetized, paralyzed dogs in normal sinus rhythm (NSR) at various rates of ECC and during ventricular fibrillation (VF) at an ECC rate of 80/min. During NSR and VF, hypercapnia did not develop and arterial oxygen saturations were maintained above 90 percent. During NSR, the PaCO2 decreased and the pH increased as the ECC rate increased. For many of the animals, coronary perfusion pressure remained above 20 mm Hg during VF, suggesting that these animals could be resuscitated to NSR. In another phase, after 15 min of VF using TTO/ECC, seven of nine animals were defibrillated. We conclude that ventilatory and hemodynamic support adequate to permit successful resuscitation to NSR is provided by the combination of TTO/ECC to apneic dogs during VF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)441-448
Number of pages8
JournalChest
Volume95
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Ventilation
Canidae
Thorax
Oxygen
Ventricular Fibrillation
Hypercapnia
Dogs
Resuscitation
Catheters
Perfusion
Hemodynamics
Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Continuous transtracheal oxygen delivery during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. An alternative method of ventilation in a canine model. / Branditz, F. K.; Kern, Karl B; Campbell, S. C.

In: Chest, Vol. 95, No. 2, 1989, p. 441-448.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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