Contributions of the left and right cerebral hemispheres to line bisection

M. Mennemeier, E. Vezey, A. Chatterjee, Steven Z Rapcsak, K. M. Heilman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thirty-one right-hemisphere lesioned (RHL) patients, 11 left-hemisphere lesioned patients (LHL) and 10 normal controls (NC) bisected lines in three spatial location and four directional cuing conditions. The error direction and error size were analyzed as separate and combined variables. Seventy-seven percent of RHL patients and 45% of LHL patients made abnormally large errors in line bisection. Right-hemisphere lesioned patients were more sensitive to spatial location and directional cuing than NC subjects. In contrast, LHL patients were less sensitive to either condition than NCs. The error direction and error size emerged as dissociable components of line bisection. Right-hemisphere lesioned patients and NC subjects bisected lines consistently to one side of the true center. Left-hemisphere lesioned patients bisected lines equally often on both sides of the true center. Both RHL and LHL patients made larger absolute bisection errors than NC subjects, but the RHL patient's errors were larger than those of the LHL patients. We propose that the greater sensitivity of RHL patients to spatial location and directional cues and the directional consistency of their bisection errors represent contributions of the intact left cerebral hemisphere to line bisection. In contrast, the LHL patient's unrestrained ability to orient to both ends of the line reflects a contribution of the intact right cerebral hemisphere to line bisection. The failure of both groups to accurately bisect lines reflects a common visuospatial processing deficit that is more pronounced following RHLs than LHLs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)703-715
Number of pages13
JournalNeuropsychologia
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 11 1997

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Keywords

  • Attention
  • Cerebral hemisphere
  • Cuing
  • Hemispace
  • Laterality
  • Line bisection
  • Spatial neglect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Contributions of the left and right cerebral hemispheres to line bisection. / Mennemeier, M.; Vezey, E.; Chatterjee, A.; Rapcsak, Steven Z; Heilman, K. M.

In: Neuropsychologia, Vol. 35, No. 5, 11.04.1997, p. 703-715.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mennemeier, M. ; Vezey, E. ; Chatterjee, A. ; Rapcsak, Steven Z ; Heilman, K. M. / Contributions of the left and right cerebral hemispheres to line bisection. In: Neuropsychologia. 1997 ; Vol. 35, No. 5. pp. 703-715.
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