Control of boundary-layer separation for lifting surfaces

W. Balzer, A. Gross, Hermann F Fasel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The lack of understanding of most of the relevant physical mechanisms when applying flow control limits the prospects of successfully transitioning flow-control technologies into real flight vehicles. Successful control of boundary-layer separation for lifting surfaces promises major performance gains especially when large laminar runs are desired in order to minimize the skin-friction drag. We systematically explore the fundamental1 mechanisms of the interaction of separation and transition that are relevant for effective and efficient flow control applications. Toward this end, we are employing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for investigating active flow control for a NACA 643-618 airfoil at a chord Reynolds number ReC=64,200 and various angles-of-attack. CFD results are compared to wind/water tunnel experiments carried out at the University of Arizona. For simulations of the entire wing section we are using a high-order-accurate finite volume code based on the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. For very highly resolved DNS which focus exclusively on the separated region on the suction side of the wing, we are employing a higher-order-accurate compact finite difference code based on the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in vorticity-velocity formulation. These simulations are set up to fully resolve the flow field and enable us to reveal some of the intricate physical mechanisms associated with unsteady separation and transition, flow instabilities, and active flow control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDepartment of Defense Proceedings of the High Performance Computing Modernization Program - Users Group Conference, HPCMP-UGC 2009
Pages37-45
Number of pages9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Event2009 DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program - Users Group Conference, HPCMP-UGC 2009 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Jun 15 2009Jun 18 2009

Other

Other2009 DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program - Users Group Conference, HPCMP-UGC 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period6/15/096/18/09

Fingerprint

Flow Control
Flow control
Boundary Layer
Boundary layers
Active Control
Computational Fluid Dynamics
Navier Stokes equations
Computational fluid dynamics
Velocity-vorticity Formulation
Higher Order
Flow Instability
Transition flow
Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations
Skin Friction
Skin friction
Airfoil
Suction
Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations
Angle of attack
Chord or secant line

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computational Theory and Mathematics
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Balzer, W., Gross, A., & Fasel, H. F. (2009). Control of boundary-layer separation for lifting surfaces. In Department of Defense Proceedings of the High Performance Computing Modernization Program - Users Group Conference, HPCMP-UGC 2009 (pp. 37-45). [5729443] https://doi.org/10.1109/HPCMP-UGC.2009.12

Control of boundary-layer separation for lifting surfaces. / Balzer, W.; Gross, A.; Fasel, Hermann F.

Department of Defense Proceedings of the High Performance Computing Modernization Program - Users Group Conference, HPCMP-UGC 2009. 2009. p. 37-45 5729443.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Balzer, W, Gross, A & Fasel, HF 2009, Control of boundary-layer separation for lifting surfaces. in Department of Defense Proceedings of the High Performance Computing Modernization Program - Users Group Conference, HPCMP-UGC 2009., 5729443, pp. 37-45, 2009 DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program - Users Group Conference, HPCMP-UGC 2009, San Diego, CA, United States, 6/15/09. https://doi.org/10.1109/HPCMP-UGC.2009.12
Balzer W, Gross A, Fasel HF. Control of boundary-layer separation for lifting surfaces. In Department of Defense Proceedings of the High Performance Computing Modernization Program - Users Group Conference, HPCMP-UGC 2009. 2009. p. 37-45. 5729443 https://doi.org/10.1109/HPCMP-UGC.2009.12
Balzer, W. ; Gross, A. ; Fasel, Hermann F. / Control of boundary-layer separation for lifting surfaces. Department of Defense Proceedings of the High Performance Computing Modernization Program - Users Group Conference, HPCMP-UGC 2009. 2009. pp. 37-45
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