Control of breathing during mechanical ventilation: Who is the boss?

Kathleen Williams, Marina Hinojosa-Kurtzberg, Sairam Parthasarathy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the past decade, concepts of control of breathing have increasingly moved from being theoretical concepts to "real world" applied science. The purpose of this review is to examine the basics of control of breathing, discuss the bidirectional relationship between control of breathing and mechanical ventilation, and critically assess the application of this knowledge at the patient's bedside. The principles of control of breathing remain under-represented in the training curriculum of respiratory therapists and pulmonologists, whereas the day-to-day bedside application of the principles of control of breathing continues to suffer from a lack of outcomes-based research in the intensive care unit. In contrast, the bedside application of the principles of control of breathing to ambulatory subjects with sleep-disordered breathing has out-stripped that in critically ill patients. The evolution of newer technologies, faster real-time computing abilities, and miniaturization of ventilator technology can bring the concepts of control of breathing to the bedside and benefit the critically ill patient. However, market forces, lack of scientific data, lack of research funding, and regulatory obstacles need to be surmounted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-139
Number of pages13
JournalRespiratory Care
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Artificial Respiration
Respiration
Critical Illness
Technology
Miniaturization
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Mechanical Ventilators
Curriculum
Intensive Care Units
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Research

Keywords

  • Artificial respiration
  • Critical illness
  • Mechanical ventilation
  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • Servo ventilation
  • Sleep apnea
  • Ventilator

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Control of breathing during mechanical ventilation : Who is the boss? / Williams, Kathleen; Hinojosa-Kurtzberg, Marina; Parthasarathy, Sairam.

In: Respiratory Care, Vol. 56, No. 2, 02.2011, p. 127-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Williams, Kathleen ; Hinojosa-Kurtzberg, Marina ; Parthasarathy, Sairam. / Control of breathing during mechanical ventilation : Who is the boss?. In: Respiratory Care. 2011 ; Vol. 56, No. 2. pp. 127-139.
@article{4c3e1c0c59244f5b8d5d92f22c2018ec,
title = "Control of breathing during mechanical ventilation: Who is the boss?",
abstract = "Over the past decade, concepts of control of breathing have increasingly moved from being theoretical concepts to {"}real world{"} applied science. The purpose of this review is to examine the basics of control of breathing, discuss the bidirectional relationship between control of breathing and mechanical ventilation, and critically assess the application of this knowledge at the patient's bedside. The principles of control of breathing remain under-represented in the training curriculum of respiratory therapists and pulmonologists, whereas the day-to-day bedside application of the principles of control of breathing continues to suffer from a lack of outcomes-based research in the intensive care unit. In contrast, the bedside application of the principles of control of breathing to ambulatory subjects with sleep-disordered breathing has out-stripped that in critically ill patients. The evolution of newer technologies, faster real-time computing abilities, and miniaturization of ventilator technology can bring the concepts of control of breathing to the bedside and benefit the critically ill patient. However, market forces, lack of scientific data, lack of research funding, and regulatory obstacles need to be surmounted.",
keywords = "Artificial respiration, Critical illness, Mechanical ventilation, Obstructive sleep apnea, Servo ventilation, Sleep apnea, Ventilator",
author = "Kathleen Williams and Marina Hinojosa-Kurtzberg and Sairam Parthasarathy",
year = "2011",
month = "2",
doi = "10.4187/respcare.01173",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "56",
pages = "127--139",
journal = "Respiratory Care",
issn = "0098-9142",
publisher = "Daedalus Enterprises Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Control of breathing during mechanical ventilation

T2 - Who is the boss?

AU - Williams, Kathleen

AU - Hinojosa-Kurtzberg, Marina

AU - Parthasarathy, Sairam

PY - 2011/2

Y1 - 2011/2

N2 - Over the past decade, concepts of control of breathing have increasingly moved from being theoretical concepts to "real world" applied science. The purpose of this review is to examine the basics of control of breathing, discuss the bidirectional relationship between control of breathing and mechanical ventilation, and critically assess the application of this knowledge at the patient's bedside. The principles of control of breathing remain under-represented in the training curriculum of respiratory therapists and pulmonologists, whereas the day-to-day bedside application of the principles of control of breathing continues to suffer from a lack of outcomes-based research in the intensive care unit. In contrast, the bedside application of the principles of control of breathing to ambulatory subjects with sleep-disordered breathing has out-stripped that in critically ill patients. The evolution of newer technologies, faster real-time computing abilities, and miniaturization of ventilator technology can bring the concepts of control of breathing to the bedside and benefit the critically ill patient. However, market forces, lack of scientific data, lack of research funding, and regulatory obstacles need to be surmounted.

AB - Over the past decade, concepts of control of breathing have increasingly moved from being theoretical concepts to "real world" applied science. The purpose of this review is to examine the basics of control of breathing, discuss the bidirectional relationship between control of breathing and mechanical ventilation, and critically assess the application of this knowledge at the patient's bedside. The principles of control of breathing remain under-represented in the training curriculum of respiratory therapists and pulmonologists, whereas the day-to-day bedside application of the principles of control of breathing continues to suffer from a lack of outcomes-based research in the intensive care unit. In contrast, the bedside application of the principles of control of breathing to ambulatory subjects with sleep-disordered breathing has out-stripped that in critically ill patients. The evolution of newer technologies, faster real-time computing abilities, and miniaturization of ventilator technology can bring the concepts of control of breathing to the bedside and benefit the critically ill patient. However, market forces, lack of scientific data, lack of research funding, and regulatory obstacles need to be surmounted.

KW - Artificial respiration

KW - Critical illness

KW - Mechanical ventilation

KW - Obstructive sleep apnea

KW - Servo ventilation

KW - Sleep apnea

KW - Ventilator

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79951594402&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79951594402&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4187/respcare.01173

DO - 10.4187/respcare.01173

M3 - Article

C2 - 21333174

AN - SCOPUS:79951594402

VL - 56

SP - 127

EP - 139

JO - Respiratory Care

JF - Respiratory Care

SN - 0098-9142

IS - 2

ER -