Coping with challenge and hindrance stressors in teams: Behavioral, cognitive, and affective outcomes

Matthew J. Pearsall, Aleksander P.J. Ellis, Jordan H. Stein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to utilize the challenge-hindrance framework to examine the discrete and combined effects of different environmental stressors on behavioral, cognitive, and affective outcomes at the team level. Results from 83 teams working on a command and control simulation indicated that the introduction of a challenge stressor positively affected team performance and transactive memory. The introduction of a hindrance stressor negatively affected team performance and transactive memory and positively affected psychological withdrawal. When the hindrance stressor was combined with the challenge stressor, teams exhibited the lowest levels of performance and transactive memory, and the highest levels of psychological withdrawal. These effects were due to the adoption of specific coping strategies by team members. Implications are discussed, as well as limitations and directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-28
Number of pages11
JournalOrganizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
Volume109
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2009

Keywords

  • Coping
  • Stress
  • Teams
  • Transactive memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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