Core content survey of undergraduate education in emergency medicine

Arthur B Sanders, Elizabeth Criss, Donald Witzke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One hundred forty-one medical schools were surveyed to determine the emergency medicine core content topics and skills being taught in the curricula. Responses were obtained from 96 schools through two mailings and a telephone followup. Most topics surveyed were offered in the vast majority of medical schools (>92%) with the exception of emergency medical services (offered in 79% of schools). Emergency medicine topics were a required part of the curriculum in a much smaller percentage of schools. No subtopics in toxicology, ophthalmologic emergencies, or emergency medical services were required in more than 30% of schools. The survey showed a similar pattern of these skills being offered in most schools, but required in a smaller number. For example, while C-spine immobilization is taught in 90% of schools, it is required in only 46%. Educators must consider a coherent, interdisciplinary knowledge base and skills list for their medical school curricula.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6-11
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Emergency Medicine
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986

Fingerprint

Emergency Medicine
Education
Medical Schools
Curriculum
Emergency Medical Services
Knowledge Bases
Telephone
Immobilization
Toxicology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Spine
Emergencies

Keywords

  • education, undergraduate, emergency medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Core content survey of undergraduate education in emergency medicine. / Sanders, Arthur B; Criss, Elizabeth; Witzke, Donald.

In: Annals of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 15, No. 1, 1986, p. 6-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sanders, Arthur B ; Criss, Elizabeth ; Witzke, Donald. / Core content survey of undergraduate education in emergency medicine. In: Annals of Emergency Medicine. 1986 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 6-11.
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