Corneal edema after pediatric cataract surgery

John W. Simon, Darren Miter, Jitka Zobal-Ratner, David Hodgetts, Michael W Belin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: We have encountered idiopathic corneal edema in four patients (five eyes) after pediatric lensectomy. This problem has not been previously described in the pediatric ophthalmology literature. Methods: Clinical and operative records were reviewed. The children, who ranged in age from 15 months to 6 years, underwent apparently uncomplicated limbal lensectomy without lens implantation. After surgery, all received subconjunctival hydrocortisone (12.5 mg) and 2 to 4 drops daily of topical prednisolone acetate. The corneal edema developed between 2 and 14 days after surgery. Results: The condition cleared in all patients during a 5- to 14-day course of intensive topical steroids. No sequelae have been apparent. Final visual acuities are 20/30 or better in the three children (four eyes) old enough for recognition acuity testing. The fifth eye has excellent central fixation. Conclusions: We suspect that the corneal decompensation was a manifestation of sterile inflammation. Two of the children had a history of iritis. Difficulty measuring cellular response at the slit-lamp examination and instilling eyedrops at home may have contributed to the complication. Postoperative corneal decompensation can be responsive to topical steroids, which we now prescribe more intensively even in apparently quiet eyes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-104
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of AAPOS
Volume1
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Corneal Edema
Cataract
Pediatrics
Steroids
Iritis
Ophthalmic Solutions
Ophthalmology
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Lenses
Visual Acuity
Hydrocortisone
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Simon, J. W., Miter, D., Zobal-Ratner, J., Hodgetts, D., & Belin, M. W. (1997). Corneal edema after pediatric cataract surgery. Journal of AAPOS, 1(2), 102-104.

Corneal edema after pediatric cataract surgery. / Simon, John W.; Miter, Darren; Zobal-Ratner, Jitka; Hodgetts, David; Belin, Michael W.

In: Journal of AAPOS, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1997, p. 102-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Simon, JW, Miter, D, Zobal-Ratner, J, Hodgetts, D & Belin, MW 1997, 'Corneal edema after pediatric cataract surgery', Journal of AAPOS, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 102-104.
Simon JW, Miter D, Zobal-Ratner J, Hodgetts D, Belin MW. Corneal edema after pediatric cataract surgery. Journal of AAPOS. 1997;1(2):102-104.
Simon, John W. ; Miter, Darren ; Zobal-Ratner, Jitka ; Hodgetts, David ; Belin, Michael W. / Corneal edema after pediatric cataract surgery. In: Journal of AAPOS. 1997 ; Vol. 1, No. 2. pp. 102-104.
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