Corruption, secrecy, and access-to-information legislation in Africa

A cross-national study of political institutions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Government corruption and secrecy are not new phenomena in Africa; however, international scrutiny has grown as nations end decades of conflict and seek to develop, donor nations consider providing more aid, and investors and transnational corporations look to the area for oil and other resources. Given that corrupt government activities account for millions of dollars diverted from public coffers each year in developing nations and lead to unfair benefit distribution to citizens, the chapter examines the global network of actors attempting to advance the international norm of government accountability to constrain corruption through advocating for the adoption of access-to-information legislation. The chapter also explores the relationship between perception of corruption in Africa and four political institutions of vertical accountability. The findings indicate that perception of corruption is inversely correlated with news media rights, civil liberties, and political rights. However, adopting access-to-information legislation or planning to adopt the law was not correlated with the perception of corruption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-352
Number of pages28
JournalResearch in Social Problems and Public Policy
Volume19
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Access to Information
Confidentiality
secrecy
political institution
Legislation
corruption
legislation
Social Responsibility
Civil Rights
Developing Countries
Oils
responsibility
political right
civil rights
dollar
investor
corporation
news
citizen
planning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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