Cost-effectiveness analysis of simvastatin and lovastatin/extended- release niacin to achieve LDL and HDL goal using NHANES data.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The Third Report of the Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults, Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) encouraged reduced low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels for a greater number of patients and reemphasized the benefits of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The purpose of this study was to compare 2 regimens achieving simultaneous LDL and HDL goals. METHODS: A decision-analytic model compared the cost-effectiveness of simvastatin and lovastatin/extended-release niacin. The perspective of the analysis was that of a health system. Product labeling was used to determine changes in cholesterol concentrations and frequencies of clinically important adverse events. The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) adult data were used for baseline cholesterol levels. Each product was titrated to achieve LDL and HDL goals unless an adverse effect occurred. Direct medical costs were determined for each treatment to determine cost-effectiveness. RESULTS: For both the 130 mg/dL and 100 mg/dL LDL goal analyses (and HDL e40 mg/dL), lovastatin/extended-release niacin had higher success rates and lower estimated direct-medical costs than simvastatin. Simvastatin had the highest success rate in achieving LDL level <160 mg/dL and HDL e40 mg/dL; however, its estimated direct-medical cost was approximately twice that of lovastatin/extended-release niacin (665 US dollars versus 333 US dollars). CONCLUSION: For the LDL goals <130 mg/dL and <100 mg/dL (and HDL e40 mg/dL) required of the majority of U.S. residents, lovastatin/extended-release niacin was both more successful and less costly than simvastatin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-258
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of managed care pharmacy : JMCP.
Volume10
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 2004

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Lovastatin
Simvastatin
Nutrition Surveys
Niacin
HDL Lipoproteins
Cost effectiveness
LDL Lipoproteins
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cholesterol
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health
Product Labeling
Costs
Nutrition
LDL Cholesterol
Labeling
HDL Cholesterol
Blood
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Health Policy
  • Pharmacy

Cite this

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title = "Cost-effectiveness analysis of simvastatin and lovastatin/extended- release niacin to achieve LDL and HDL goal using NHANES data.",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The Third Report of the Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults, Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) encouraged reduced low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels for a greater number of patients and reemphasized the benefits of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The purpose of this study was to compare 2 regimens achieving simultaneous LDL and HDL goals. METHODS: A decision-analytic model compared the cost-effectiveness of simvastatin and lovastatin/extended-release niacin. The perspective of the analysis was that of a health system. Product labeling was used to determine changes in cholesterol concentrations and frequencies of clinically important adverse events. The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) adult data were used for baseline cholesterol levels. Each product was titrated to achieve LDL and HDL goals unless an adverse effect occurred. Direct medical costs were determined for each treatment to determine cost-effectiveness. RESULTS: For both the 130 mg/dL and 100 mg/dL LDL goal analyses (and HDL e40 mg/dL), lovastatin/extended-release niacin had higher success rates and lower estimated direct-medical costs than simvastatin. Simvastatin had the highest success rate in achieving LDL level <160 mg/dL and HDL e40 mg/dL; however, its estimated direct-medical cost was approximately twice that of lovastatin/extended-release niacin (665 US dollars versus 333 US dollars). CONCLUSION: For the LDL goals <130 mg/dL and <100 mg/dL (and HDL e40 mg/dL) required of the majority of U.S. residents, lovastatin/extended-release niacin was both more successful and less costly than simvastatin.",
author = "Armstrong, {Edward P} and Zachry, {Woodie M.} and Malone, {Daniel C}",
year = "2004",
month = "5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "251--258",
journal = "Journal of managed care & specialty pharmacy",
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publisher = "Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP)",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cost-effectiveness analysis of simvastatin and lovastatin/extended- release niacin to achieve LDL and HDL goal using NHANES data.

AU - Armstrong, Edward P

AU - Zachry, Woodie M.

AU - Malone, Daniel C

PY - 2004/5

Y1 - 2004/5

N2 - OBJECTIVE: The Third Report of the Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults, Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) encouraged reduced low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels for a greater number of patients and reemphasized the benefits of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The purpose of this study was to compare 2 regimens achieving simultaneous LDL and HDL goals. METHODS: A decision-analytic model compared the cost-effectiveness of simvastatin and lovastatin/extended-release niacin. The perspective of the analysis was that of a health system. Product labeling was used to determine changes in cholesterol concentrations and frequencies of clinically important adverse events. The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) adult data were used for baseline cholesterol levels. Each product was titrated to achieve LDL and HDL goals unless an adverse effect occurred. Direct medical costs were determined for each treatment to determine cost-effectiveness. RESULTS: For both the 130 mg/dL and 100 mg/dL LDL goal analyses (and HDL e40 mg/dL), lovastatin/extended-release niacin had higher success rates and lower estimated direct-medical costs than simvastatin. Simvastatin had the highest success rate in achieving LDL level <160 mg/dL and HDL e40 mg/dL; however, its estimated direct-medical cost was approximately twice that of lovastatin/extended-release niacin (665 US dollars versus 333 US dollars). CONCLUSION: For the LDL goals <130 mg/dL and <100 mg/dL (and HDL e40 mg/dL) required of the majority of U.S. residents, lovastatin/extended-release niacin was both more successful and less costly than simvastatin.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The Third Report of the Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults, Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) encouraged reduced low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels for a greater number of patients and reemphasized the benefits of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The purpose of this study was to compare 2 regimens achieving simultaneous LDL and HDL goals. METHODS: A decision-analytic model compared the cost-effectiveness of simvastatin and lovastatin/extended-release niacin. The perspective of the analysis was that of a health system. Product labeling was used to determine changes in cholesterol concentrations and frequencies of clinically important adverse events. The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) adult data were used for baseline cholesterol levels. Each product was titrated to achieve LDL and HDL goals unless an adverse effect occurred. Direct medical costs were determined for each treatment to determine cost-effectiveness. RESULTS: For both the 130 mg/dL and 100 mg/dL LDL goal analyses (and HDL e40 mg/dL), lovastatin/extended-release niacin had higher success rates and lower estimated direct-medical costs than simvastatin. Simvastatin had the highest success rate in achieving LDL level <160 mg/dL and HDL e40 mg/dL; however, its estimated direct-medical cost was approximately twice that of lovastatin/extended-release niacin (665 US dollars versus 333 US dollars). CONCLUSION: For the LDL goals <130 mg/dL and <100 mg/dL (and HDL e40 mg/dL) required of the majority of U.S. residents, lovastatin/extended-release niacin was both more successful and less costly than simvastatin.

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