Cost savings from anemia management with biosimilar epoetin alfa and increased access to targeted antineoplastic treatment: A simulation for the EU G5 countries

Ivo Abraham, Lucy Han, Diana Sun, Karen Macdonald, Matti Aapro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aim: We simulated the budget impact of biosimilar erythropoiesis- stimulating agent (ESA) in EU G5 countries. Materials & methods: Three models were built to estimate the number of patients who could be provided with antineoplastic therapy with rituximab, bevacizumab or trastuzumab from cost savings of biosimilar erythropoietin use in a hypothetical panel of 100,000 patients. The associated number of patients needed to convert to biosimilar ESA to provide such treatments was also calculated. Results: Under fixed dosing, the savings from 100% conversion were €110,592,159, translating into an additional 9770 rituximab, 3912 bevacizumab, or 3713 trastuzumab treatments. Under weight-based dosing, the savings from 100% conversion were €146,170,333, corresponding to an additional 12,913 rituximab, 5171 bevacizumab or 4908 trastuzumab treatments. The number of patients needed to convert ranged from four to 51. Conclusion: Using biosimilar ESA for supportive cancer care yields significant savings and increases accessibility to primary antineoplastic therapy in a budget neutral way.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1599-1609
Number of pages11
JournalFuture Oncology
Volume10
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014

Keywords

  • EU
  • antineoplastic therapy
  • biosimiar
  • budgetary impact
  • cancer
  • chemotherapy-induced anemia
  • epoetin alfa
  • simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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