CO2-Induced Ocean Warming of the Antarctic Continental Shelf in an Eddying Global Climate Model

Paul B. Goddard, Carolina O. Dufour, Jianjun Yin, Stephen M. Griffies, Michael Winton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ocean warming near the Antarctic ice shelves has critical implications for future ice sheet mass loss and global sea level rise. A global climate model with an eddying ocean is used to quantify the mechanisms contributing to ocean warming on the Antarctic continental shelf in an idealized 2xCO2 experiment. The results indicate that relatively large warm anomalies occur both in the upper 100 m and at depths above the shelf floor, which are controlled by different mechanisms. The near-surface ocean warming is primarily a response to enhanced onshore advective heat transport across the shelf break. The deep shelf warming is initiated by onshore intrusions of relatively warm Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW), in density classes that access the shelf, as well as the reduction of the vertical mixing of heat. CO2-induced shelf freshening influences both warming mechanisms. The shelf freshening slows vertical mixing by limiting gravitational instabilities and the upward diffusion of heat associated with CDW, resulting in the buildup of heat at depth. Meanwhile, freshening near the shelf break enhances the lateral density gradient of the Antarctic Slope Front (ASF) and disconnect isopycnals between the shelf and CDW, making cross-ASF heat exchange more difficult. However, at several locations along the ASF, the cross-ASF heat transport is less inhibited and heat can move onshore. Once onshore, lateral and vertical heat advection work to disperse the heat anomalies across the shelf region. Understanding the inhomogeneous Antarctic shelf warming will lead to better projections of future ice sheet mass loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8079-8101
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Oceans
Volume122
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

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Climate models
climate models
continental shelves
shelves
global climate
continental shelf
climate modeling
oceans
warming
heat
heating
ocean
deep water
Ice
vertical mixing
shelf break
ice
ice sheet
slopes
anomaly

Keywords

  • Antarctica shelf freshening
  • Antarctica shelf warming
  • eddying climate model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Forestry
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Materials Chemistry
  • Palaeontology

Cite this

CO2-Induced Ocean Warming of the Antarctic Continental Shelf in an Eddying Global Climate Model. / Goddard, Paul B.; Dufour, Carolina O.; Yin, Jianjun; Griffies, Stephen M.; Winton, Michael.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, Vol. 122, No. 10, 01.10.2017, p. 8079-8101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goddard, Paul B. ; Dufour, Carolina O. ; Yin, Jianjun ; Griffies, Stephen M. ; Winton, Michael. / CO2-Induced Ocean Warming of the Antarctic Continental Shelf in an Eddying Global Climate Model. In: Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans. 2017 ; Vol. 122, No. 10. pp. 8079-8101.
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