Cough during infancy and subsequent childhood asthma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Wheezing in infancy has been associated with subsequent asthma, but whether cough similarly influences asthma risk has been little studied. We sought to determine whether prolonged cough and cough without cold in the first year of life are associated with childhood asthma. Methods: Participants in the Infant Immune Study, a non-selected birth cohort, were surveyed 7 times in the first 9 months of life regarding the presence of wheeze and cough. Cough for more than 28 days was defined as prolonged. Parents were asked at 1 year if the child ever coughed without a cold. Asthma was defined as parental report of physician diagnosis of asthma, with symptoms or medication use between 2 and 9 years. Logistic regression was used to assess adjusted odds for asthma associated with cough characteristics. Results: A total of 24% (97) of children experienced prolonged cough and 23% (95) cough without cold in the first 9 months, respectively. Prolonged cough was associated with increased risk of asthma relative to brief cough (OR 3.57, CI: 1.88, 6.76), with the risk being particularly high among children of asthmatic mothers. Cough without cold (OR 3.13, 95% CI: 1.76, 5.57) was also independently associated with risk of childhood asthma. Both relations persisted after adjustment for wheeze and total IgE at age 1. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance: Prolonged cough in infancy and cough without cold are associated with childhood asthma, independent of infant wheeze. These findings suggest that characteristics of cough in infancy are early markers of asthma susceptibility, particularly among children with maternal asthma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1439-1446
Number of pages8
JournalClinical and Experimental Allergy
Volume45
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Fingerprint

Cough
Asthma
Mothers
Respiratory Sounds
Immunoglobulin E
Parents
Logistic Models
Parturition

Keywords

  • Allergy
  • Childhood asthma
  • Cough
  • LRIs
  • Parental asthma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Cough during infancy and subsequent childhood asthma. / Oren, Eyal -; Rothers, Janet L; Stern, D. A.; Morgan, Wayne J; Halonen, M.; Wright, Anne L.

In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, Vol. 45, No. 9, 01.09.2015, p. 1439-1446.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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