Cranial compression ischemic encephalopathy: Fetal neurological injury related to the mechanical forces of labor and delivery

Barry S. Schifrin, Pierre Deymier, Wayne R. Cohen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Intrapartum events including asphyxia in term fetuses account for significant amounts of subsequent neurological handicap, including cerebral palsy (CP). The prevention of such handicap is a major justification for fetal surveillance during labor as well as for the increasing cesarean delivery rate. Despite the pervasive application of electronic fetal heart rate (FHR) monitoring for the detection of fetal asphyxia and the rising cesarean rate, there has been no diminution of the rates of CP, neonatal seizures or neonatal encephalopathy, despite a reduction in the frequency of stillbirth attributable to asphyxia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationStress and Developmental Programming of Health and Disease
Subtitle of host publicationBeyond Phenomenology
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages651-688
Number of pages38
ISBN (Electronic)9781634633703
ISBN (Print)9781633218369
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

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Keywords

  • Asphyxia
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Cranial compression
  • Encephalopathy
  • Fetal neurological injury
  • Hypoxia
  • Neonatal seizure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Schifrin, B. S., Deymier, P., & Cohen, W. R. (2014). Cranial compression ischemic encephalopathy: Fetal neurological injury related to the mechanical forces of labor and delivery. In Stress and Developmental Programming of Health and Disease: Beyond Phenomenology (pp. 651-688). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..