Critical Care Nurses’ Cognitive Ergonomics Related to Medical Device Alarms

Shu Fen Wung, Marilyn Rose Schatz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study uniquely gained insight into the intricacy of intensive care nurses’ decision-making process when responding to and managing device alarms. Difficulty in responding to alarms included low staffing, multiple job responsibilities, and competing priority tasks. Novice nurses are more tolerant of alarms sounding owing to a lower threshold of comfort with resetting or silencing alarms; more experienced nurses are more comfortable resetting alarm limits to the patient's baseline. Understanding the decision-making process used by nurses can guide the development of policies and learning experiences that are crucial clinical support for alarm management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-202
Number of pages12
JournalCritical care nursing clinics of North America
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2018

Keywords

  • Alarm fatigue
  • Decision making
  • Human factors
  • Intensive care
  • Monitor alarms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care

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