Crop coefficients for Arizona landscape trees

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Water use of many landscape plants is not only a factor of how much water a plant needs, but rather how much it receives. Previous research has found that desert-adapted trees such as live oak, once thought to be a low water user, will readily consume several times the quantity of water considered necessary for such a plant. Knowing the actual amount of water a particular tree species needs to survive or to grow to mature size will be helpful in applying irrigation water more judiciously. This information will help landscape managers and managers of water to increase the water use efficiency. In times of water shortage, the actual minimum, rather than the estimated minimum water requirements can be applied to maintain functionality of established landscape trees. Applying less irrigation water than required to achieve maximum growth can also be helpful in reducing plant maintenance such as pruning. The objectives of this project were to determine how nine species of commonly grown trees in southwestern semi-arid landscapes perform regarding growth and quality when irrigated to allow 30%, 50% or 70% depletion of available water in the soil. Results from this study will help to determine safe levels of soil water depletion to ensure growth and functionality. Data was collected on soil moisture and when combined with local weather data, resulted in the development of crop coefficients for three species of trees considered high, medium, or low water use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASABE - 5th National Decennial Irrigation Conference 2010, Held in Conjunction with Irrigation Show 2010
Pages984-992
Number of pages9
Volume2
StatePublished - 2010
Event5th National Decennial Irrigation Conference 2010, Held in Conjunction with Irrigation Show 2010 - Phoenix, AZ, United States
Duration: Dec 5 2010Dec 8 2010

Other

Other5th National Decennial Irrigation Conference 2010, Held in Conjunction with Irrigation Show 2010
CountryUnited States
CityPhoenix, AZ
Period12/5/1012/8/10

Fingerprint

crop coefficient
water
soil water
irrigation water
managers
Quercus virginiana
water quantity
water shortages
water requirement
ornamental plants
meteorological data
pruning
water use efficiency
deserts

Keywords

  • Crop coefficients
  • Landscape trees

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Martin, E. C., Schuch, U. K., Subramani, J. ., & Tilak, M. (2010). Crop coefficients for Arizona landscape trees. In ASABE - 5th National Decennial Irrigation Conference 2010, Held in Conjunction with Irrigation Show 2010 (Vol. 2, pp. 984-992)

Crop coefficients for Arizona landscape trees. / Martin, Edward C; Schuch, Ursula K; Subramani, Jayashankar -; Tilak, Mahato.

ASABE - 5th National Decennial Irrigation Conference 2010, Held in Conjunction with Irrigation Show 2010. Vol. 2 2010. p. 984-992.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Martin, EC, Schuch, UK, Subramani, J & Tilak, M 2010, Crop coefficients for Arizona landscape trees. in ASABE - 5th National Decennial Irrigation Conference 2010, Held in Conjunction with Irrigation Show 2010. vol. 2, pp. 984-992, 5th National Decennial Irrigation Conference 2010, Held in Conjunction with Irrigation Show 2010, Phoenix, AZ, United States, 12/5/10.
Martin EC, Schuch UK, Subramani J, Tilak M. Crop coefficients for Arizona landscape trees. In ASABE - 5th National Decennial Irrigation Conference 2010, Held in Conjunction with Irrigation Show 2010. Vol. 2. 2010. p. 984-992
Martin, Edward C ; Schuch, Ursula K ; Subramani, Jayashankar - ; Tilak, Mahato. / Crop coefficients for Arizona landscape trees. ASABE - 5th National Decennial Irrigation Conference 2010, Held in Conjunction with Irrigation Show 2010. Vol. 2 2010. pp. 984-992
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