Cryptosporidium Enterocytozoon, and Cyclospora infections in pediatric and adult patients with diarrhea in Tanzania

J. Peter Cegielski, Ynes R. Ortega, Scott McKee, John F. Madden, Loretta Gaido, David A. Schwartz, Karim Manji, Anders F. Jorgensen, Sara E. Miller, Uma P. Pulipaka, Abel E. Msengi, David H. Mwakyusa, Charles R. Sterling, L. Barth Reller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

90 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cryptosporidiosis, microsporidiosis, and cyclosporiasis were studied in four groups of Tanzanian inpatients: adults with AIDS-associated diarrhea, children with chronic diarrhea (of whom 23 of 59 were positive [+] for human immunodeficiency virus [HIV]), children with acute diarrhea (of whom 15 of 55 were HIV+), and HIV- control children without diarrhea. Cryptosporidium was identified in specimens from 6/86 adults, 5/59 children with chronic diarrhea (3/5, HIV+), 7/55 children with acute diarrhea (0/7, HIV+), and 0/20 control children. Among children with acute diarrhea, 7/7 with cryptosporidiosis were malnourished, compared with 10/48 without cryptosporidiosis (P < .01). Enterocytozoon was identified in specimens from 3/86 adults, 2/59 children with chronic diarrhea (1 HIV+), 0/55 children with acute diarrhea, and 4/20 control children. All four controls were underweight (P < .01). Cyclospora was identified in specimens from one adult and one child with acute diarrhea (HIV-). Thus, Cryptosporidium was the most frequent and Cyclospora the least frequent pathogen identified. Cryptosporidium and Enterocytozoon were associated with malnutrition. Asymptomatic fecal shedding of Enterocytozoon in otherwise healthy, HIV- children has not been described previously.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)314-321
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Cegielski, J. P., Ortega, Y. R., McKee, S., Madden, J. F., Gaido, L., Schwartz, D. A., Manji, K., Jorgensen, A. F., Miller, S. E., Pulipaka, U. P., Msengi, A. E., Mwakyusa, D. H., Sterling, C. R., & Reller, L. B. (1999). Cryptosporidium Enterocytozoon, and Cyclospora infections in pediatric and adult patients with diarrhea in Tanzania. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 28(2), 314-321. https://doi.org/10.1086/515131