Cultural context moderates the relationship between emotion control values and cardiovascular challenge versus threat responses

Iris B. Mauss, Emily A Butler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cultural context affects people's values regarding emotions, as well as their experiential and behavioral but not autonomic physiological responses to emotional situations. Little research, however, has examined how cultural context influences the relationships among values and emotional responding. Specifically, depending on their cultural context, individuals' values about emotion control (ECV; the extent to which they value emotion control) may have differing meanings, and as such, be associated with differing responses in emotional situations. We examined this possibility by testing the effect of two cultural contexts (28 female Asian-American (AA) versus 28 female European-American (EA) undergraduate students) on the associations between individuals' ECV and emotional responding (experiential, behavioral, and cardiovascular) to a relatively neutral film clip and a laboratory anger provocation. In the AA group, greater ECV were associated with reduced anger experience and behavior, and a challenge pattern of cardiovascular responding. In the EA group, greater ECV were associated with reduced anger behavior but not anger experience, and a threat pattern of cardiovascular responding. These results are consistent with the notion that individuals' values about emotion are associated with different meanings in different cultural contexts, and in turn, with different emotional and cardiovascular responses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)521-530
Number of pages10
JournalBiological Psychology
Volume84
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010

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Keywords

  • Cardiovascular threat versus challenge
  • Cultural differences
  • Emotion
  • Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Cultural context moderates the relationship between emotion control values and cardiovascular challenge versus threat responses. / Mauss, Iris B.; Butler, Emily A.

In: Biological Psychology, Vol. 84, No. 3, 07.2010, p. 521-530.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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