Curcumin, but not curcumin-glucuronide, inhibits Smad signaling in TGFβ-dependent bone metastatic breast cancer cells and is enriched in bone compared to other tissues

Andrew G. Kunihiro, Julia A. Brickey, Jennifer B. Frye, Paula B. Luis, Claus Schneider, Janet L Funk

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Abstract

Breast cancer (BCa) bone metastases (BMETs) drive osteolysis via a feed-forward loop involving tumoral secretion of osteolytic factors (e. g., PTHrP) induced by bone-matrix-derived growth factors (e. g., TGFβ). In prior experiments, turmeric-derived curcumin inhibited in vivo BMET progression and in vitro TGFβ/Smad-signaling in a TGFβ-stimulated PTHrP-dependent human xenograft BCa BMET model (MDA-SA cells). However, it is unclear whether curcumin or curcumin-glucuronide mediates in vivo protection since curcumin-glucuronide is the primary circulating metabolite in rodents and in humans. Thus, effects of curcumin vs. curcumin-glucuronide on Smad-dependent TGFβ signaling were compared in a series of BCa cell lines forming TGFβ-dependent BMET in murine models, and tissue-specific metabolism of curcumin in mice was examined by LC–MS. While curcumin inhibited TGFβ-receptor-mediated Smad2/3 phosphorylation in all BCa cells studied (human MDA-SA, MDA-1833, MDA-2287 and murine 4T1 cells), curcumin-glucuronide did not. Similarly, curcumin, but not curcumin-glucuronide, blocked TGFβ-stimulated secretion of PTHrP from MDA-SA and 4T1 cells. Because the predominant serum metabolite, curcumin-glucuronide, lacked bioactivity, we examined tissue-specific metabolism of curcumin in mice. Compared to serum and other organs, free curcumin (both absolute and percentage of total) was significantly increased in bone, which was also a rich source of enzymatic deglucuronidation activity. Thus, curcumin, and not curcumin-glucuronide, appears to inhibit bone-tropic BCa cell TGFβ-signaling and to undergo site-specific activation (deconjugation) within the bone microenvironment. These findings suggest that circulating curcumin-glucuronide may act as a prodrug that preferentially targets bone, a process that may contribute to the bone-protective effects of curcumin and other highly glucuronidated dietary polyphenols.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages150-156
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Volume63
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Curcumin
Bone
Cells
Tissue
Breast Neoplasms
Bone and Bones
Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein
Neoplasm Metastasis
Bone Neoplasms
Metabolites
Metabolism
curcumin glucuronide
Cell signaling
Curcuma
Tropics
Osteolysis
Phosphorylation
Bone Matrix
Prodrugs
Polyphenols

Keywords

  • Bone metastasis
  • Breast cancer
  • Curcumin
  • Glucuronide
  • TGFβ

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Curcumin, but not curcumin-glucuronide, inhibits Smad signaling in TGFβ-dependent bone metastatic breast cancer cells and is enriched in bone compared to other tissues. / Kunihiro, Andrew G.; Brickey, Julia A.; Frye, Jennifer B.; Luis, Paula B.; Schneider, Claus; Funk, Janet L.

In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, Vol. 63, 01.01.2019, p. 150-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Breast cancer (BCa) bone metastases (BMETs) drive osteolysis via a feed-forward loop involving tumoral secretion of osteolytic factors (e. g., PTHrP) induced by bone-matrix-derived growth factors (e. g., TGFβ). In prior experiments, turmeric-derived curcumin inhibited in vivo BMET progression and in vitro TGFβ/Smad-signaling in a TGFβ-stimulated PTHrP-dependent human xenograft BCa BMET model (MDA-SA cells). However, it is unclear whether curcumin or curcumin-glucuronide mediates in vivo protection since curcumin-glucuronide is the primary circulating metabolite in rodents and in humans. Thus, effects of curcumin vs. curcumin-glucuronide on Smad-dependent TGFβ signaling were compared in a series of BCa cell lines forming TGFβ-dependent BMET in murine models, and tissue-specific metabolism of curcumin in mice was examined by LC–MS. While curcumin inhibited TGFβ-receptor-mediated Smad2/3 phosphorylation in all BCa cells studied (human MDA-SA, MDA-1833, MDA-2287 and murine 4T1 cells), curcumin-glucuronide did not. Similarly, curcumin, but not curcumin-glucuronide, blocked TGFβ-stimulated secretion of PTHrP from MDA-SA and 4T1 cells. Because the predominant serum metabolite, curcumin-glucuronide, lacked bioactivity, we examined tissue-specific metabolism of curcumin in mice. Compared to serum and other organs, free curcumin (both absolute and percentage of total) was significantly increased in bone, which was also a rich source of enzymatic deglucuronidation activity. Thus, curcumin, and not curcumin-glucuronide, appears to inhibit bone-tropic BCa cell TGFβ-signaling and to undergo site-specific activation (deconjugation) within the bone microenvironment. These findings suggest that circulating curcumin-glucuronide may act as a prodrug that preferentially targets bone, a process that may contribute to the bone-protective effects of curcumin and other highly glucuronidated dietary polyphenols.",
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AU - Brickey, Julia A.

AU - Frye, Jennifer B.

AU - Luis, Paula B.

AU - Schneider, Claus

AU - Funk, Janet L

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N2 - Breast cancer (BCa) bone metastases (BMETs) drive osteolysis via a feed-forward loop involving tumoral secretion of osteolytic factors (e. g., PTHrP) induced by bone-matrix-derived growth factors (e. g., TGFβ). In prior experiments, turmeric-derived curcumin inhibited in vivo BMET progression and in vitro TGFβ/Smad-signaling in a TGFβ-stimulated PTHrP-dependent human xenograft BCa BMET model (MDA-SA cells). However, it is unclear whether curcumin or curcumin-glucuronide mediates in vivo protection since curcumin-glucuronide is the primary circulating metabolite in rodents and in humans. Thus, effects of curcumin vs. curcumin-glucuronide on Smad-dependent TGFβ signaling were compared in a series of BCa cell lines forming TGFβ-dependent BMET in murine models, and tissue-specific metabolism of curcumin in mice was examined by LC–MS. While curcumin inhibited TGFβ-receptor-mediated Smad2/3 phosphorylation in all BCa cells studied (human MDA-SA, MDA-1833, MDA-2287 and murine 4T1 cells), curcumin-glucuronide did not. Similarly, curcumin, but not curcumin-glucuronide, blocked TGFβ-stimulated secretion of PTHrP from MDA-SA and 4T1 cells. Because the predominant serum metabolite, curcumin-glucuronide, lacked bioactivity, we examined tissue-specific metabolism of curcumin in mice. Compared to serum and other organs, free curcumin (both absolute and percentage of total) was significantly increased in bone, which was also a rich source of enzymatic deglucuronidation activity. Thus, curcumin, and not curcumin-glucuronide, appears to inhibit bone-tropic BCa cell TGFβ-signaling and to undergo site-specific activation (deconjugation) within the bone microenvironment. These findings suggest that circulating curcumin-glucuronide may act as a prodrug that preferentially targets bone, a process that may contribute to the bone-protective effects of curcumin and other highly glucuronidated dietary polyphenols.

AB - Breast cancer (BCa) bone metastases (BMETs) drive osteolysis via a feed-forward loop involving tumoral secretion of osteolytic factors (e. g., PTHrP) induced by bone-matrix-derived growth factors (e. g., TGFβ). In prior experiments, turmeric-derived curcumin inhibited in vivo BMET progression and in vitro TGFβ/Smad-signaling in a TGFβ-stimulated PTHrP-dependent human xenograft BCa BMET model (MDA-SA cells). However, it is unclear whether curcumin or curcumin-glucuronide mediates in vivo protection since curcumin-glucuronide is the primary circulating metabolite in rodents and in humans. Thus, effects of curcumin vs. curcumin-glucuronide on Smad-dependent TGFβ signaling were compared in a series of BCa cell lines forming TGFβ-dependent BMET in murine models, and tissue-specific metabolism of curcumin in mice was examined by LC–MS. While curcumin inhibited TGFβ-receptor-mediated Smad2/3 phosphorylation in all BCa cells studied (human MDA-SA, MDA-1833, MDA-2287 and murine 4T1 cells), curcumin-glucuronide did not. Similarly, curcumin, but not curcumin-glucuronide, blocked TGFβ-stimulated secretion of PTHrP from MDA-SA and 4T1 cells. Because the predominant serum metabolite, curcumin-glucuronide, lacked bioactivity, we examined tissue-specific metabolism of curcumin in mice. Compared to serum and other organs, free curcumin (both absolute and percentage of total) was significantly increased in bone, which was also a rich source of enzymatic deglucuronidation activity. Thus, curcumin, and not curcumin-glucuronide, appears to inhibit bone-tropic BCa cell TGFβ-signaling and to undergo site-specific activation (deconjugation) within the bone microenvironment. These findings suggest that circulating curcumin-glucuronide may act as a prodrug that preferentially targets bone, a process that may contribute to the bone-protective effects of curcumin and other highly glucuronidated dietary polyphenols.

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