Cyanobacterial Contribution to Algal Nuclear Genomes Is Primarily Limited to Plastid Functions

Adrian Reyes-Prieto, Jeremiah Hackett, Marcelo B. Soares, Maria F. Bonaldo, Debashish Bhattacharya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A single cyanobacterial primary endosymbiosis that occurred approximately 1.5 billion years ago [1-3] is believed to have given rise to the plastid in the common ancestor of the Plantae or Archaeplastida-the eukaryotic supergroup comprising red, green (including land plants), and glaucophyte algae [4-8]. Critical to plastid establishment was the transfer of endosymbiont genes to the host nucleus (i.e., endosymbiotic gene transfer [EGT]) [9, 10]. It has been postulated that plastid-derived EGT played a significant role in plant nuclear-genome evolution, with 18% (or 4,500) of all nuclear genes in Arabidopsis thaliana having a cyanobacterial origin with about one-half of these recruited for nonplastid functions [11]. Here, we determine whether the level of cyanobacterial gene recruitment proposed for Arabidopsis is of the same magnitude in the algal sisters of plants by analyzing expressed-sequence tag (EST) data from the glaucophyte alga Cyanophora paradoxa. Bioinformatic analysis of 3,576 Cyanophora nuclear genes shows that 10.8% of these with significant database hits are of cyanobacterial origin and one-ninth of these have nonplastid functions. Our data indicate that unlike plants, early-diverging algal groups appear to retain a smaller number of endosymbiont genes in their nucleus, with only a minor proportion of these recruited for nonplastid functions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2320-2325
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume16
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 5 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Plastids
nuclear genome
plastids
algae
Genes
Genome
Cyanophora
Gene transfer
endosymbionts
genes
gene transfer
Algae
Arabidopsis
embryophytes
Plantae
expressed sequence tags
Embryophyta
bioinformatics
Plant Genome
Expressed Sequence Tags

Keywords

  • EVO_ECOL

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Cyanobacterial Contribution to Algal Nuclear Genomes Is Primarily Limited to Plastid Functions. / Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Hackett, Jeremiah; Soares, Marcelo B.; Bonaldo, Maria F.; Bhattacharya, Debashish.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 16, No. 23, 05.12.2006, p. 2320-2325.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reyes-Prieto, Adrian ; Hackett, Jeremiah ; Soares, Marcelo B. ; Bonaldo, Maria F. ; Bhattacharya, Debashish. / Cyanobacterial Contribution to Algal Nuclear Genomes Is Primarily Limited to Plastid Functions. In: Current Biology. 2006 ; Vol. 16, No. 23. pp. 2320-2325.
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