Cyclospora: An enigma worth unraveling

Charles R Sterling, Ynés R. Ortega

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In part, Cyclospora cayetanensis owes its recognition as an emerging pathogen to the increased use of staining methods for detecting enteric parasites such as Cryptosporidium. First reported in patients in New Guinea in 1977 but thought to be a coccidian parasite of the genus Isospora, C. cayetanensis received little attention until it was again described in 1985 in New York and Peru. In the early 1990s, human infection associated with waterborne transmission of C. cayetanensis was suspected; foodborne transmission was likewise suggested in early studies. The parasite was associated with several disease outbreaks in the United States during 1996 and 1997. This article reviews current knowledge about C. cayetanensis (including its association with waterborne and foodborne transmission), unresolved issues, and research needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-53
Number of pages6
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume5
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1999

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Cyclospora
Parasites
Isospora
New Guinea
Cryptosporidium
Peru
Disease Outbreaks
Staining and Labeling
Infection
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Cyclospora : An enigma worth unraveling. / Sterling, Charles R; Ortega, Ynés R.

In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 5, No. 1, 1999, p. 48-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sterling, Charles R ; Ortega, Ynés R. / Cyclospora : An enigma worth unraveling. In: Emerging Infectious Diseases. 1999 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 48-53.
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