De furore Britannico: The Rosicrucian manifestos in Britain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Rosicrucian manifestos of 1614-1615 were published in England in 1652, based on a translation that circulated foratleast twenty years in manuscript copies in Englandand Scotland. The manifestos were introduced in apreface by the Welsh alchemist Thomas Vaughan (1623-1666), who had published a series of short books on aspects of alchemy and esoteric knowledge. Ignoring the radical religious and political overtones of the Rosicrucian message developed in Germany, Vaughan emphasized the limitations of European science and the power of the learning that Christian Rosenkreuz was said to have brought from the Arab world. He concentrated on the Rosicrucians' 'physical work' in alchemy, but he understood it as having implications for beyond the physical world in the celestial and supercelestial worlds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-61
Number of pages30
JournalAries
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Furore
Alchemy
Manifesto
Scotland
Manuscripts
Germany
England
Physical
Religion
Arab World
Physical World
Alchemist

Keywords

  • Alchemy
  • Manifestos
  • Rosicrucianism
  • Thomas
  • Vaughan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Religious studies
  • Philosophy

Cite this

De furore Britannico : The Rosicrucian manifestos in Britain. / Willard, Thomas S.

In: Aries, Vol. 14, No. 1, 2014, p. 32-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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