Deaf and hearing parents' perceptions of family functioning.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this descriptive study was to compare Deaf and hearing parents' perceptions of family functioning. The Feetham Family Functioning Survey (FFFS) was administered in American Sign Language on videotape to 40 Deaf mothers and fathers and in its original written English form to a comparison group of 40 hearing mothers and fathers. There were no statistically significant differences in FFFS discrepancy (D) subscale scores among Deaf versus hearing parents. Deaf and hearing parents' scores on the FFFS importance (C) subscale items were used to identify the 10 areas of family functioning most important to the parents. Agreement among Deaf and hearing parents was noted on 7 of 10 items ranked as most important. One difference was that Deaf parents ranked leisure/recreational activities as more important than hearing parents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-105
Number of pages4
JournalNursing Research
Volume44
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1995

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Hearing
Parents
Fathers
Mothers
Sign Language
Videotape Recording
Leisure Activities
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Deaf and hearing parents' perceptions of family functioning. / Jones, Elaine G.

In: Nursing Research, Vol. 44, No. 2, 03.1995, p. 102-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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