Death and the Self

Shaun B Nichols, Nina Strohminger, Arun Rai, Jay Garfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is an old philosophical idea that if the future self is literally different from the current self, one should be less concerned with the death of the future self (Parfit,). This paper examines the relation between attitudes about death and the self among Hindus, Westerners, and three Buddhist populations (Lay Tibetan, Lay Bhutanese, and monastic Tibetans). Compared with other groups, monastic Tibetans gave particularly strong denials of the continuity of self, across several measures. We predicted that the denial of self would be associated with a lower fear of death and greater generosity toward others. To our surprise, we found the opposite. Monastic Tibetan Buddhists showed significantly greater fear of death than any other group. The monastics were also less generous than any other group about the prospect of giving up a slightly longer life in order to extend the life of another.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)314-332
Number of pages19
JournalCognitive Science
Volume42
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

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Fear
Population
Denial (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Buddhism
  • Death
  • Parfit
  • Personal identity
  • Self

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Artificial Intelligence

Cite this

Nichols, S. B., Strohminger, N., Rai, A., & Garfield, J. (2018). Death and the Self. Cognitive Science, 42, 314-332. https://doi.org/10.1111/cogs.12590

Death and the Self. / Nichols, Shaun B; Strohminger, Nina; Rai, Arun; Garfield, Jay.

In: Cognitive Science, Vol. 42, 01.05.2018, p. 314-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nichols, SB, Strohminger, N, Rai, A & Garfield, J 2018, 'Death and the Self', Cognitive Science, vol. 42, pp. 314-332. https://doi.org/10.1111/cogs.12590
Nichols SB, Strohminger N, Rai A, Garfield J. Death and the Self. Cognitive Science. 2018 May 1;42:314-332. https://doi.org/10.1111/cogs.12590
Nichols, Shaun B ; Strohminger, Nina ; Rai, Arun ; Garfield, Jay. / Death and the Self. In: Cognitive Science. 2018 ; Vol. 42. pp. 314-332.
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