Decreased nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion in chronically hypoglycemic late-gestation fetal sheep is due to an intrinsic islet defect

Paul J. Rozance, Sean W. Limesand, William W. Hay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

We measured in vivo and in vitro nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion in late gestation fetal sheep to determine whether an intrinsic islet defect is responsible for decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in response to chronic hypoglycemia. Control fetuses responded to both leucine and lysine infusions with increased arterial plasma insulin concentrations (average increase: 0.13 ± 0.05 ng/ml leucine; 0.99 ± 0.26 ng/ml lysine). In vivo lysine-stimulated insulin secretion was decreased by chronic (0.37 ± 0.18 ng/ml) and acute (0.27 ± 0.19 ng/ml) hypoglycemia. Leucine did not stimulate insulin secretion following acute hypoglycemia but was preserved with chronic hypoglycemia (0.12 ± 0.09 ng/ml). Isolated pancreatic islets from chronically hypoglycemic fetuses had normal insulin and DNA content but decreased fractional insulin release when stimulated with glucose, leucine, arginine, or lysine. Isolated islets from control fetuses responded to all nutrients. Therefore, chronic late gestation hypoglycemia causes defective in vitro nutrient-regulated insulin secretion that is at least partly responsible for diminished in vivo GSIS. Chronic hypoglycemia is a feature of human intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and might lead to an islet defect that is responsible for the decreased insulin secretion patterns seen in human IUGR fetuses and low-birth-weight human infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E404-E411
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume291
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

Keywords

  • Glucose
  • Hypoglycemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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