Decreasing oxidative stress with choline and carnitine in women

Dileep S. Sachan, Nobuko Hongu, Maike Johnsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Fatty acid oxidation is predominantly a mitochondrial event, which is enhanced by dietary choline and carnitine supplementation resulting in extra reactive oxygen species (ROS) load. The objective was to assess oxidative stress level by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances [TEARS] in choline and carnitine supplemented healthy women before and after mild exercise. Methods: Nineteen free-living women completed the placebo control study in which choline and/or L-carnitine was orally taken for 21 days. Anthropometric measurements, dietary recall, exercise routine and blood samples were analyzed to determine body composition, nutrients intake, distance walked and biochemical markers related to oxidative stress. Results: TEARS were significantly lower in the groups supplemented with choline, carnitine or both and the mild exercise (walking) was not a deterrent in this effect of the supplements. Serum vitamin A and E concentrations were higher in the supplemented groups even though the consumption of these nutrients was not different among the groups. Conclusion: Choline and carnitine supplementation lowers lipid peroxidation, and promotes conservation of retinol and α-tocopherol in free-living women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-176
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American College of Nutrition
Volume24
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carnitine
carnitine
choline
Choline
Oxidative Stress
oxidative stress
exercise
Exercise
Vitamin A
vitamin A
Food
beta oxidation
Tocopherols
diet recall
Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances
anthropometric measurements
blood serum
Body Composition
Vitamin E
tocopherols

Keywords

  • Antioxidant
  • Carnitine
  • Choline
  • Oxidative stress
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Decreasing oxidative stress with choline and carnitine in women. / Sachan, Dileep S.; Hongu, Nobuko; Johnsen, Maike.

In: Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol. 24, No. 3, 06.2005, p. 172-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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