Defining cyberbullying

Elizabeth Englander, Edward I Donnerstein, Robin Kowalski, Carolyn A. Lin, Katalin Parti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Is cyberbullying essentially the same as bullying, or is it a qualitatively different activity? The lack of a consensual, nuanced definition has limited the field's ability to examine these issues. Evidence suggests that being a perpetrator of one is related to being a perpetrator of the other; furthermore, strong relationships can also be noted between being a victim of either type of attack. It also seems that both types of social cruelty have a psychological impact, although the effects of being cyberbullied may be worse than those of being bullied in a traditional sense (evidence here is by no means definitive). A complicating factor is that the 3 characteristics that define bullying (intent, repetition, and power imbalance) do not always translate well into digital behaviors. Qualities specific to digital environments often render cyberbullying and bullying different in circumstances, motivations, and outcomes. To make significant progress in addressing cyberbullying, certain key research questions need to be addressed. These are as follows: How can we define, distinguish between, and understand the nature of cyberbullying and other forms of digital conflict and cruelty, including online harassment and sexual harassment? Once we have a functional taxonomy of the different types of digital cruelty, what are the short- and long-term effects of exposure to or participation in these social behaviors? What are the idiosyncratic characteristics of digital communication that users can be taught? Finally, how can we apply this information to develop and evaluate effective prevention programs?

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S148-S151
JournalPediatrics
Volume140
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

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Bullying
Sexual Harassment
Aptitude
Social Behavior
Motivation
Communication
Psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Englander, E., Donnerstein, E. I., Kowalski, R., Lin, C. A., & Parti, K. (2017). Defining cyberbullying. Pediatrics, 140, S148-S151. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2016-1758U

Defining cyberbullying. / Englander, Elizabeth; Donnerstein, Edward I; Kowalski, Robin; Lin, Carolyn A.; Parti, Katalin.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 140, 01.11.2017, p. S148-S151.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Englander, E, Donnerstein, EI, Kowalski, R, Lin, CA & Parti, K 2017, 'Defining cyberbullying', Pediatrics, vol. 140, pp. S148-S151. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2016-1758U
Englander E, Donnerstein EI, Kowalski R, Lin CA, Parti K. Defining cyberbullying. Pediatrics. 2017 Nov 1;140:S148-S151. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2016-1758U
Englander, Elizabeth ; Donnerstein, Edward I ; Kowalski, Robin ; Lin, Carolyn A. ; Parti, Katalin. / Defining cyberbullying. In: Pediatrics. 2017 ; Vol. 140. pp. S148-S151.
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